My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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SEATTLE, Friday—Strange to say, if you begin by being late you seem to be late all along the line. We started late on this trip, were late in reaching Los Angeles and missed our connection. Five of us were bound for San Francisco, however, and so United Airlines courteously sent another plane up and I made my connection at Oakland for Seattle, arriving at 7:00 p.m., which was still an hour late.

The trip was interesting because we went from sunshine to dense fog in such a short space of time that I would look out and see the snowcapped mountains, read for a few minutes, and be astonished to find, on looking out again, that I could see nothing but grey clouds all about us. At one point, we had the most beautiful rainbow in front and behind us. We caught a glimpse of Mt. Rainier, but only of the lower slopes, for its top was enveloped in clouds. As far as San Franciso, a very charming gentleman from New England was with us. There is a type which is quite unmistakable, most charming and cultivated, and at home all over the world. This type of gentleman grows best in the environment of Boston, and we, who sat near enough to chat with him, all had a pleasanter trip because of his presence.

On the last lap of my journey, another gentleman told me that he had known my husband and attended a meeting with him in Utica, New York, in 1928. He had grown up in Syracuse, but for the past 11 years has been settled here in the Northwest, and though he still likes his native state, he is an ardent admirer of this part of the country now.

At Portland, Ore., in spite of the drizzling rain, the Mayor and some Democratic ladies came down with a beautiful bunch of Portland roses which I brought on to my daughter. I was very glad to see Anna and John waiting for me at the airport in Seattle. Even though I was twelve hours late and criss-crossed the Continent to get to them, it was well worth it. We talked till nearly midnight, and are not caught up yet.

The grandchildren always seem to me to change. Even in the few months since they left us in Washington, I find Eleanor thinner and taller, and Curtis more grown up. Young Johnny has learned to crawl so fast around the room that nothing is safe from his inquiring eyes and hands.

The mail awaited me asking me to do more things than I could possibly do if I had weeks at my disposal, and I have just forty hours. In addition, all up and down the Coast people think I have so many unoccupied days I can just stop off for a day and address a meeting, or visit with them in their homes. I wish that this was possible, and I appreciate deeply the many kind invitations, but, unfortunately, from the time I leave here tomorrow afternoon, all my time will be scheduled, for I shall be on a lecture trip. That means living up to the plans made by my lecture manager, and not being free to dispose of much time for interests of my own.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL