My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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GOLDEN BEACH, Fla., Tuesday—We were very busy yesterday morning getting Jimmy off to his plane. His friends, the Ned Brandons from Boston, came to see him and sat in the sun for a while, and then offered to drive him to the airport. I went up to talk to him while he packed and finally, very reluctantly saw him leave.

A little while later, Franklin, Jr.'s wife, Ethel, called me up to say she had come down to be with her mother, sister and sister-in-law at the Boca Raton Club, and that they were driving over to the races and would stop to see me either on their way over or on their way home. I told her I would greet them warmly whenever they stopped, for I had no intention of leaving my own domain. It was nearly six o'clock when the young things turned up, all looking much too young and pretty to carry any responsibilities. We had a nice talk, and they thought I had picked out a nice place to hibernate. Ethel said that she knew that if Franklin, Jr., didn't have examinations staring him in the face just now, that I would have received word that they both wanted to come and stay!

The National Society for Crippled Children of the United States of America, which has its headquarters in Elyria, Ohio, sends me word that on the first of March they will open their annual Easter Seal drive. This national society has state associations and the Easter Seal drive helps to finance these state groups. They work on legislation upholding anything which will help to increase the state's responsibility for the cost, care and treatment of crippled children. They are most anxious to see federal aid extended for the education of physically handicapped children of all types. In 1937 it was estimated that a total of 1,873,231 handicapped children needed special education, and less than ten percent of that number were receiving it. At the same time that this society watches legislation the groups cooperate with social welfare agencies in making happier the lot of crippled children.

I mention this sale now instead of later, because while it extends through to Easter Sunday, I feel that many people awakened to the need will be willing to help and cooperate in making it a success.

Last night I read three stories about dogs by Alexander Woollcott, collected in a little book called:- "Verdun Belle". That is the name of one of these stories which the "Town Crier" read over the air. Everyone who likes dogs will enjoy these stories.

If you happen to be interested in the effect that schools can have on the growth of communities, I think you will enjoy reading Miss Elsie Clapp's book:- "Community Schools In Action." She is a most interesting and unique person who did a remarkable piece of work in two different schools for the communities in which she lived.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL