My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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GOLDEN BEACH, Fla., Monday—Yesterday was the most beautiful sunny and windless morning which we have had since arriving here We all sat out on the beach and sunned ourselves, and even brought our one and only visitor out with us, rather than retire to the house even for a brief hour. Some of us had lunch under the cabana awning, but were finally driven in by one of those short showers which blow up so quickly in this part of the world.

Jimmy was off to see various friends for part of the afternoon and evening. The rest of us spent the afternoon reading, sleeping and doing the mail, which is still with us even on a holiday. I think that Miss Thompson has about a quarter of the day free on a holiday. The rest of her time she spends in a little tiled loggia which is bright with sun most of the time. This, perhaps, gives the illusion that she is working less than if she were in her Washington office, but I can't see that there is a tremendous amount of difference.

Last evening we went over to the Miami-Biltmore pools to see the Water Revue of 1940. It is a delightful show featuring some wonderful diving by some of the most famous diving stars. One of the most charming features is the swimming of Kay Mattern and Jerry Walsh, which is remarkably precise and graceful. The comedians, who interspersed the real diving feats, were better, I thought, than those at the Acquacade at the World's Fair. One enjoys the whole show more here, because it is in a more intimate setting and makes one feel more a part of what is going on. The very high dive always takes my breath away, in fact all the divers have my sincere admiration and breathless attention until their feats are successfully performed.

B'nai B'rith had sent me a notice of the youth meetings which their organization sponsored in cooperation with twenty other youth-serving agencies, during the week of Washington's Birthday. They say that representatives of three million young people of all races, creeds and colors, held simultaneous youth and democracy rallies in more than three hundred communities, and that at these rallies the ten goodwill resolutions—which I printed recently in my column—were read aloud. Young people are less prejudiced than older people, and it is well to confirm them in their leaning toward respect and understanding for other young people of different backgrounds and beliefs.

The more youth can be stirred to take an interest in citizenship, the better for the future of the country, and I am glad to see that both youth-serving agencies and youth groups are more keenly interested year by year.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL