My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Thursday —I had a picturesque visitor yesterday afternoon in Chief Kiutus Tecumseh, of Cashmere, Washington, bearing a box of Wenatchee Valley apples. The apples look and taste extremely good. I thought he looked a trifle worn and sad in spite of a very colorful costume with much beadwork on it. He told me he was a singer and loved to tell the story and history of the Indians, but found that there was remarkably little interest in his people and audiences were scarce. This seems strange to me, for the Indians have skills and arts developed over hundreds of years and there is much to be learned by us from these people who have suffered so much at our hands.

Later, the members of the Salmon Fisheries Commission came to tea. I was interested to find that they knew something of my Maine Coast as well as of their Pacific Coast. Some of them come from Seattle and know my daughter and son-in-law, which is always a bond.

At 7:30 I went to the dinner given by the American Planning and Civic Association, presided over by Mr. Frederic A. Delano. It was a very pleasant dinner because they could point to plans made and things accomplished and look forward with confidence to steady progress in the future. To Mr. Delano it must have been a satisfaction to see how deeply people appreciated the service which he had rendered. Here is a man who retired from business fairly young and then proceeded to give his services and to work just as hard at the business of being a good citizen, as he had worked for years at the business of providing for his family. Over and over again the phrase was repeated: "We thank you for the service you have rendered."

After the dinner I went to the Birthday Ball given by the colored employees of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing .

Today I lunched with Miss Frances Perkins and a small and very pleasant group of women. The President never calls a Cabinet meeting on a Thursday, so she thought this was a safe day to do her duty in giving me a luncheon, but at about noon, she received word that there would be a Cabinet meeting at 3:00 o'clock. It has really become quite a joke with us, for, if by chance, she is lunching with me, we can be quite sure that, that will be the day the President sends for her at the lunch hour. This unexpected summons hurried our luncheon today somewhat, but I was able to walk part of the way home and discovered that we suddenly had made a rapid advance toward spring. The air is soft and pleasant and everything is melting under foot.

This afternoon I am going to a reception given by Mrs. Hull, wife of the Secretary of State, and tonight we have our last formal dinner and state reception. This one, given to the Army and Navy, always comes at the end of the season and is almost as colorful as the diplomatic reception. There are usually more people attending this reception than any other, but they are so well disciplined that they take less time to pass by and shake hands. The President is taking the train after the reception for Hyde Park and I am going to New York City on the night train and will join him in the country on Saturday.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL