My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Thursday—Last evening we went to a concert given by the National Symphony Orchestra. In the first part of the program, one of Strauss' compositions, which I had never heard before, was played. I was sorry not to hear the Brahms Symphony in F Major, for my guests who stayed on after I had to leave, said it was beautifully rendered.

I had to go to the broadcasting station where Mrs. Ellen Woodward and Miss Jane Hooey and I conversed together over the air at 10:15 p.m. on some of the changes in the Social Security Act. I am becoming increasingly conscious of the importance of this act in the lives of a great many people. There will, of course, be more changes, for anything which touches so many people cannot remain static. Circumstances under which we live are constantly changing and therefore an act of this kind must change to meet new needs and new conditions.

A friend of mine, who came to see me the other day, is very insistent that, sad as the war is, we in the United States are great travellers and will still be. Ordinarily most of our travelling has been in Europe, or in places which at present are not healthy for pleasure jaunts because of war activities. Therefore, for the first time, we are probably going to make it a point not only to see our own United States, but to see many other places in North and South America. My friend insists that this will mean the discovery by many people of beauties and interests which they never before realized.

The celebrations which are to begin this spring in Arizona and New Mexico, should be of special interest to those who are interested in the first settlements in this country. We can also see many of our most interesting Indian tribes. In many ways, we are trying to help these tribes to recapture some of their old arts and skills and to adapt them to modern use. At the same time, the nation will have to grow in knowledge and appreciation of the value of these Indian made goods. I hope, therefore, if the San Francisco World's Fair opens again next spring, more of our citizens will journey out there, where they may see the Indian courts, which were to me the most thrilling part of the Indian exhibit at the Fair.

Since jobs are of necessity a matter of concern to our young college boys and girls, I was very much interested to receive from a girl who is studying journalism at Hunter College, New York City, the following information: "The bureau of occupations at my college has formulated a plan whereby business and professional women in New York City, with a reasonable expenditure of time on their part, can help graduating students in choosing a career. Six metropolitan organizations with a total membership of over two thousand business and professional business women, are cooperating on a program of career conferences which aim to acquaint graduating seniors with employment possibilities in New York City and to bring them in personal contact with workers in various fields." This is a splendid idea and I hope it will be carried out in many of the colleges.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL