My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

NEW YORK, Tuesday—Dr. Reeves of the Youth Commission was on the plane with me flying to New York City yesterday afternoon. As I left the bus, he told me he was to be on the air last night. I am distressed that I have missed so many of these broadcasts on questions concerning youth. From what I hear they have been most interesting.

I reached my apartment a little after five, and after a quiet dinner, Mrs. Henry Morgenthau, Jr., and I spent a most interesting evening seeing "The Time of Your Life" a play by William Saroyan. I have always supposed that it would be impossible to recognize anyone in the audience across the footlights, so I was tremendously pleased last night when I thought I caught Mr. Dowling's eye and really received a wave of recognition. Of course, it may not have been meant for me!

There is something in this play which is reminiscent of "Here Come the Clowns," which I so much enjoyed last year. Every character on the stage is interesting. The staging is excellent and I think every part was well taken. Gene Kelly does some exceptionally good dancing and Julie Haydon gives a sensitive and understanding portrayal of a difficult character. Mr. Dowling has come to be the center of any play in which I have seen him of late, because the appreciation I feel for the way in which he portrays humor, sentiment and deep human emotions. The humor of "Time of Your Life" is delightful and the audience which filled the theatre last night enjoyed itself, but I think they must have gone away with a good deal to think about.

This morning I went to the office of "Woman's Day" magazine to have a photograph taken with the winner of a recipe contest held by the magazine, Mrs. H. C. Davis, of North Cohocton, N. Y. She sat down with me and we tasted New England succotash, which is her particular dish and she suggests for church suppers. It has one great advantage in that it can be prepared the day before and improve in flavor by standing. I can vouch for the fact that it tastes extremely good, for I would have liked to finish the whole bowl before me, but in the interest of my figure, I refrained!

Afterwards I went to the little shop called: "Trade Winds," which has been started as an outlet for refugee hand and craft work, and found some attractive things to add to my Christmas gifts. Then I visted the Little Gallery on East 8th Street, where some of the artists of the neighborhood are exhibiting paintings and craft work. By this time, it was time to go to the Hotel Roosevelt for the Symposium on Household Employment luncheon, in which twenty-two women's organizations cooperated. I had an opportunity to hear Dr. Watson sum up the morning's round table discussions, and I hope that this extremely interesting meeting will lead to some real action in this field of domestic employment.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL