My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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LOGAN, W. Va., Wednesday—The drive from Lancaster to York, Pa., yesterday afternoon was lovely and through rich farming country. Mr. Laucks had asked us to stay and, since that was impossible, we drove up to his place and I had an opportunity to walk around the grounds. From the terrace there is a most beautiful view of the Susquehanna River. Mr. William Adams Delano, who built the house, has given it the atmosphere of intimacy, which to me is the most charming thing about a French house. As you come in, the wall around the courtyard seems to shut out the outer world. One stout and ageing scottie accompanied his master around and two young and vociferous scotties were chained up near the stable. They wriggled and jumped in their efforts to get free and follow us and, since I can never resist Scotties, I had to go and pat them.

We had a glimpse of a Japanese garden, very charmingly laid out on a hillside with a tiny waterfall dropping into a succession of pools. Off in the distance we had a glimpse of two thousand white turkeys covering a hillside, but I did not have time to see the dairy where Mr. Laucks has some very remarkable stock.

It must be most interesting to have a place of this kind which gives an opportunity for real business management and yet has great beauty. Mr. Laucks kept telling me how much he wanted the President to come to see it. I know the President would enjoy it, but I fear this visit will have to wait until Washington days are over.

In York we passed through some interesting old streets. I was much interested in a bit of history which I probably should have known, namely, that York was the seat of the first meeting of the Continental Congress and that the first national Thanksgiving Day was proclaimed here by George Washington after the Battle of Saratoga. No one seemed to know exactly what date this was. Perhaps that year had some of the difficulties that we are having this year.

Once at the hotel we had a few minutes to unpack. Then came a press conference consisting largely of high school students and a short visit from the local representative of the NYA, who brought me some interesting pictures of their projects.

The sewing project makes costumes for various school activities and for poor children, a toy project reconditions toys of every kind and has reached thousands of children every Christmas. These are projects carried on by NYA and WPA all over the country, so there was no real loss in not having time to go out to visit them.

After the lecture we drove into Harrisburg. We are now on the train for Bluefield, W.Va., from where we drive 96 miles to Logan, W. Va.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL