My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Tuesday—Dr. Gilmore of Iowa State University gave a most interesting speech at the Parent's Magazine Annual Luncheon yesterday. It was a difficult thing to do, for he had to make it in two parts since only half of it could be on the air. He gave everybody present much food for thought. I felt deeply honored that the Committee had chosen me to receive their award this year. The child's head on the medal I received is really a lovely thing which I shall enjoy. Of course, I realize that it is because of my good fortune in being associated with so many groups who are doing good work for the children of our country that I have been given this recognition and I wish all of them could have been honored with me.

It speaks well for the parents of the country that the circulation of this magazine has passed the half million mark, for it means a really serious effort on their part in self-education.

Between all my engagements yesterday, I did a little Christmas shopping. Among other things, I spent some very pleasant moments picking out books which I thought would be enjoyed later on by some of my friends. At 4:00 o'clock I was finding my way to the Women's City Club, which is now in Rockefeller Center. I had not been to the club since it moved and there were so many people there that it was difficult to picture what it would be like under normal circumstances. I enjoyed seeing old friends and made up my mind I must try to go there more often.

At 6:00 o'clock I took the train to Philadelphia to attend the evening meeting of the National Girl Scout executives. It was held in the Convention Hall and hundreds of girls filled the main floor. They were followed by the massed flags of the United States, accompanied by flags of other nations where girl scouting is being carried on. The scene was a thrilling one.

I think Mrs. Hoover, who has made the Girl Scouts one of her main interests, must have a great sense of satisfaction in looking at so many young girls together and realizing what this organization she has fostered has been able to do for them all over the country.

Back at my apartment in New York, I could not help spending a little time glancing through two books which had been sent me. One has a most intriguing name and came as a result of the Parent's Magazine lunch. It is called "Do Adolescents Need Parents," and is written by Katharine Whiteside Taylor, and published for the Committee on Human Relations of the Progressive Education Association. There is much in it, I think, which parents and young people will find interesting and helpful.

Then I turned to a book called "The Living Goya" by Miss Mercedes C. Barbarrosa. This I found fascinating reading and the numerous illustrations of Goya's work add greatly to the book. He was one of Spain's great artists. His story is an interesting one, so it seems to me this book will be of value in any school or library where children are to be given an opportunity to know great painters.

Today I am going on with my shopping and attending the first session of the Herald Tribune Forum.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL