My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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SEATTLE, Monday—Yesterday afternoon I left Newark, N.J., at 5:00 o'clock on my way to Seattle, Wash., to see Anna, John and the children. I confess to being quite excited at seeing my youngest grandson again after such a long time. Children at his age change more than they do later on and, while Eleanor and Curtis are just about as they were last spring, their little brother is now a real personality. Even at 9 and 12 years, however, they did change a good deal in six months.

The weather was not very pleasant yesterday and I started with a feeling that this might be a longer trip than I had anticipated. The weather was none too good after we left Chicago, but I arrived only three hours late.

There seem to be a number of interesting things going on in the field of art these days. I received an invitation to attend the free concerts which are being given from October first to seventh at Rockefeller Plaza, to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers. American music by our best composers will be played by symphony orchestras and the best swing bands. The financing of this free festival is being done by the membership of this society as a gesture of appreciation to the American public. Mr. Gene Buck is president of the ASCAP and anyone who is familiar with his abilities as an impressario will know that every one of these concerts will be worth attending. I only wish that I could be in New York City, but I am just about as far away as one can be and still remain in the United States.

The newspapers are less and less cheerful reading, and so, in a world where hatred seems dominant, it is interesting to see the September publication of the International Committee of the Young Mens' Christian Associations of the United States and Canada, which is called "Today's Youth and Tomorrow's World."

Tomorrow, October 3rd, in several hundred cities in North America, the Young Mens' Christian Associations will begin the observance of the fiftieth anniversary of their world service program. The YMCA has spread all over the world since two secretaries set out on October 3rd, 1889, from their posts in North America, John T. Swift to go to Tokyo, Japan, and David McConaughy, Jr., to Madras, India. These men went in response to requests from missionary groups and representative leaders in these far away countries, to help develop a work similar to that being done in this country.

This work has led YMCA workers since into fields of danger in many different countries. It has inspired many young men both at home and abroad, and has drawn together young people of many different nationalities and creeds. One can only hope that even though the world seems to be turning to force and hatred at present, that societies such as this may grow in strength during the years to come.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL