My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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ROBINSON, Ill., Sunday —We had a most delightful visit in Delavan, Ill. We stayed with Mrs. S. R. Kemp, at the home of her father, Mr. James Bailey. The atmosphere was one we all wish might prevail in every American home. The family was gathered happily and made us feel welcome and not in the least a burden. That is a rare feat of hospitality, when you entertain two persons who bring you so much trouble in the way of telegrams, mail and even visitors.

I had an opportunity in the afternoon to see some of Mr. Bailey's young Hereford cattle being shipped off to be fattened. We also went into one of the most glorious cornfields I have ever seen. The corn stood away above our heads and many of the stalks had three huge ears. This is very rich land and a purely agricultural district.

It was interesting, as we drove south yesterday morning about 175 miles, to notice the gradual change in the land. Robinson, which we reached yesterday, is in a rural section, but the land is not so good and the farming is, of necessity, diversified. They are dependent here on a certain amount of industry and have a small refinery, a candy factory and a pottery works which makes bathroom fixtures.

Two of the NYA directors from the neighborhood came to see me and told me there were no youth projects in Robinson itself and no WPA or NYA load to speak of here, which makes this a very fortunate locality. The government, however, has helped them to build, through a PWA grant, a very beautiful gymnasium for the high school students, back of which they have a football field lighted by flood-lights so they can play at night.

After the lecture we went to the home of one of our hostesses and met members of the Junior Women's Club, which seems to be a very active organization.

This is a peaceful, beautiful day and we motored to Paris, Ill., to take a train for Huntington, W. Va.

In this part of the world the Chicago Tribune is the one paper offered to you most frequently. As I read it this morning, I could not help but feel a little sympathy for a writer who must, I suppose from necessity, occasionally write things which he must know are not entirely true. It is fortunate that some things are facts which even partisanship cannot distort. This spirit, however, is never readily displayed in the field of domestic affairs.

There is a fine editorial in this paper on the defense of Warsaw by the Poles. It seems to me that all of us, no matter with whom we may sympathize in this struggle, must take off our hats to the defenders of the Polish capital. When you read from Berlin the account of the German armies that conquered most of Poland, and realize that the Russian armies have entered on the opposite front, the kind of bravery shown by these soldiers in their capital city gives your own spirit a certain lift.

Human beings are capable of such heroism that it makes up for the fact that we can, on occasion, be mean and ungracious and not quite truthful.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL