My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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GREENVILLE, S.C., En Route, Friday—By the time we reached the train last night, we really had had a fairly full day. After writing you yesterday, I went to the tea at Governor and Mrs. Dixon's and had the pleasure of greeting the members of the State Legislature who closed their session on September 15th.

One of the interesting things about being in different parts of the country is the opportunity to read local newspapers. You soon discover what foreign or national news has an interest for the editors of these papers, but the really valuable education for the visitor lies in getting in touch with the local interests of the communities. For instance, Alabama has a new parole board on which they have a woman member. I was interested to meet her yesterday afternoon after reading about her in the paper.

After the tea we went out to have an informal dinner with Colonel and Mrs. Murfee, passing through fields of cotton where the pickers were busy. It is a pretty sight and I wish we could have spent a little more time in seeing some of the outdoor activities on this plantation, for they told me they are doing diversified farming, have a herd of Angus cattle and grow peanuts.

We hurried back to the hotel from dinner to change and be ready for the lecture, after which we attended a short reception at the home of Mrs. M. R. Nachman, president of the Parent Teachers Association, under whose auspices I spoke.

The flowers which are always in profusion in every Southern home make me rather envious. Over the small houses in one of the U. S. housing developments there was a most lovely and delicate vine with pink flowers, which added immensely to the charm of what seemed to be a well laid out and well-planned group of buildings.

This trip, with its chance to view a good deal of our southern countryside, has reminded me of an article by Donald Culross Peattie, which I read in the New York Times magazine. To be sure he writes of the whole United States and urges us as we visit our World's Fairs at the opposite ends of the nation to get some idea of what we could see at all times, in New England, in the Middle West, in the Far West, in the North and in the South. He writes of our marvelous scenery and the birds and beasts which we too often take for granted.

In every city where I have been, my attention has been drawn to the fact that this is National Retail Demonstration week, and the retailers are certainly putting their best foot foremost. They are showing their confidence in the common sense of the consumers by giving them an opportunity to see new styles and new goods at an early season.

We are spending today on the train bound for Danville, Virginia, and tomorrow morning we will be back in Washington.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL