My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

HYDE PARK, Thursday—Days like the present, where you pick up a newspaper every day wondering what you will find and trying to understand what lies back of the news you read, require of all educated people disciplined minds and disciplined characters. Blindly to ask for peace is no help in the present situation, for peace may be bought today at too high a cost in the future. It may be wise to buy it, but you must do so knowing what your objectives are for the future and accept the conditions which are a part of the price which is paid. None today can afford to allow a prejudice or a one-sided point of view to dominate their minds, they must examine every side of a question and must be sure they are not allowing any personal considerations to enter into the ultimate standards which they decide to set up for themselves and for their nation.

According to the newspapers, by six o'clock this evening, one man may decide to plunge Europe into war. Undoubtedly he hopes to achieve what he desires without war. The thing which must appall every citizen in a democracy is the fact that this important decision rests with one man.

I saw a number of people in New York City yesterday afternoon. I was very much impressed by Miss Rummell, a teacher from Missouri, one of whose pupils has just won a thousand dollar essay contest. She has sold an article on education to one of the magazines with a wide circulation and her ideas on education are interesting. She believes that discipline is one of things which education should teach us, and I am inclined to agree with her.

After the Hobby Lobby broadcast last night, which I particularly enjoyed, because I was so interested in all the hobbyists, I said goodbye with real regret to the various people who run the program. They have been so very kind to me that it has been a pleasure to spend three Wednesday evenings with them.

We drove ourselves back to Hyde Park, leaving the chauffeur with another car to pick up little Franklin, III, at the station this morning and bring him to Hyde Park. He is now a year old and full of life and apparently enjoyed his drive up and the trip down from Campobello Island. He is now ensconcedin the big house awaiting the arrival of his father and mother, who are sailing down the coast, and I am going over to see to make sure that all is well.

I sank into bed last night with a feeling of great luxury. The city had been hot and not very attractive, so to lie with the moon shining down on my porch and find two blankets a pleasant covering, seemed good beyond measure. Our purple loose-strife is almost gone, but it is fading very beautifully, giving the green grass across our little pond a lovely rosy tinge. We humans should take lessons from nature and fade as gracefully. Perhaps we cling too much to the years of full bloom. If you fade gracefully, you may be just as attractive. Our loose-strife certainly is.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL