My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Tuesday—I have had so many interesting books sent me in the last few days that I would like to sit down and read without stopping. Some of them really take only a few minutes to appreciate. Among these is a book called: "The Songs of San Francisco," which I think anyone going to the exposition there will enjoy having as a reminder of the trip.

Then there is George Palmer Putnam's "Soaring Wings," the greater part of which I imagine I read in the articles which came out in Liberty Magazine. There may be more in the book, however, and I am glad in any case to have it in permanent form, for this is the record of a friend one can never forget in a book to be treasured on one's library.

Then there are three new plays which I shall read through tonight, sent me by the Dramatists Play Service, Inc., which is publishing for young people a series of plays dealing with freedom and democracy. I will tell you more about them when I have read them.

There is a pamphlet which describes the Nova Scotia cooperatives and which is published by the Cooperative League of the U.S.A. These cooperatives are modelled on the Swedish ones and there is much of real helpful information in the pamphlet. In the People's Library, a regional library containing 1200 books, which distributes to smaller libraries, cooperative stores and credit unions in the area adjacent to Aberdeen, Caledonia and Reserve Mines, there hangs a motto which seems to me worthy of remembrance:

"There are four sorts of men:

He who knows not, and knows not that he knows not, is a fool— shun him.

He who knows not and knows that he knows not, is a child—teach him.

He who knows and knows not that he knows, is asleep— wake him.

He who knows and knows that he knows, is wise— follow him."

Then there is a study conducted in Rockland County, N. Y., on "Government At Work," which shows the relationship between every governmental agency of the county to the lives of the people and is a real contribution to the understanding of democracy. In addition to all these, several interesting books have come in, but I am still reading a novel called "Rebecca" by Daphne du Maurier, which I find quite charming, so I can not yet tell you about other books, but I think you will agree with me that I can find plenty to read during the next few days.

We expected some guests from Maine last night, but they had motor trouble and difficulty finding the way, so they telephoned in utter discouragement about 8:30 p.m. that they would spend the night where they were and will not reach us until noon today.

The weather has been fairly warm here, as elsewhere during the last few days, and I am glad for the sake of my guests, who seem to be coming from all directions just now, that this morning is cooler.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL