My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Thursday—Yesterday I spent the day in Sayville, Long Island, with my brother. He has a little cottage on Mr. and Mrs. Robert Deans' place, which is a wildlife preserve. We went by boat to the beach on Fire Island and the water was perfect in temperature and not too rough, even a smooth water swimmer like myself could enjoy it. There is nothing quite like lying on a sandy beach in the sun for complete relaxation. We had the best possible picnic, which Mrs. Dean supervised, and I have an idea that anything she does is always well done. The gentleman who cooked, had built his own outdoor fireplace from long experience in the woods and his chicken and coffee were excellent indeed.

I returned to New York City in time to change and to meet some friends for dinner before the HobbyLobby radio program. It is fortunate that we rehearse these programs beforehand, because I become so interested in watching the children cheer their mice in the race, that I entirely forgot that I had to continue the program. When we were really on the air, I had to resolutely look the other way, or I am sure I would have forgotten again because the children were so excited about their pets.

After leaving New York City, we drove up to the town hall in Hyde Park village, and I spoke for a few minutes at a League of Women Voters party. It seemed a shame to stop the dance, but I enjoyed seeing many people there. Mr. Shaemas O'Sheel and Mr. Robert Barnes had really filled the serious part of the evening, with Miss Dickerman presiding, and when I came in, the La Place band of Poughkeepsie, with Nick Benny leading, was doing very well from the entertainment standpoint.

Every time I go to New York City without going to the World's Fair, I feel a little guilty, for there is so much I still want to see and have not seen. I have never been back to the Federal Building, which I want to go through very carefully, I have not seen the WPA exhibit, and I have a childish desire to see "Titania's Palace" as well as innumerable foreign and state buildings which I have not yet glanced at. Perhaps next week when I go down again for Hobby-Lobby, I will have a spare hour or two which I can spend there. If not, I shall cerrainly try to steal a day or two later and spend full days there.

I finished a book called "The Story Of A Lake," by Negley Farson. It is an interesting psychological study of a man who loved a woman, but who was never completely satisfied and therefore turned to other women, always looking for perfection and never finding it. Finally, when he lost the woman who really held his mind and gave him the best type of companionship, his grief drove him to take refuge with nature in a final effort to cleanse his soul. I have known men who resembled this man in some ways, and I think, perhaps, the book will add to the understanding which human beings should have for each other, but often fail to have.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL