My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Thursday—Yesterday afternoon, Miss Thompson, Mr. and Mrs. Gray and I went up for a little while to the old house at Tivoli, New York, then on to a friend's house for a swim and dinner. Early this morning, at 7:00 o'clock in fact, I left in my own car for New York City and went straight to my mother-in-law's house to go with her to the steamer.

I always like to go on board to see where my family is going to be esconced during a trip of any kind, but I never like to stay to see the steamer actually leave. Even when people are going for pleasure and you want them to go, the actual moment of parting is never very pleasant and I much prefer not prolonging it by watching either a train or steamer pull out.

I left Mrs. Roosevelt about 11:00 o'clock and went down to my apartment. From there I went to see a very dear friend who has been ill for some time. As it was my first visit in many weeks, I was very happy to feel that he was able again to enjoy seeing anyone.

Then an hour with the dentist and a drive out to the World's Fair. Mr. Grover Whalen had arranged that the Encyclopaedia Britannica Inc., would present a set to the Arthurdale, W. Va., school, and they asked me to receive this set, which I was very glad to do. Then I proceeded on my way, back to Hyde Park for supper with my guests, whom I had deserted for the whole day. A set of the encyclopaedia has also been offered for the White House library and word has been sent to the President. Someone in Washington will be ready to receive it.

I was tremendously interested yesterday to read the resolution passed by the American Youth Congress. The effort which has been made to brand the Congress as Communist-controlled and the final effort which was made to stampede them into doing something which would have been completely undemocratic, has been, I think, wisely handled. On the whole, the leadership of the Congress seems to me to be very sane. It may be a little idealistic, but then if we can't have ideals in our youth, what will happen to us when we are old? The Congress may have hopes for accomplishments which may not be realized, but without hope and faith in the future, we would all of us die. I hope that the action now taken, and the evidence of sincerity which these meetings have shown, will bring to the American Youth Congress and the various groups which constitute it, not only the support of youth, but the support of many older people.

My husband and I were both very much grieved to receive the news of the death of Mr. T. Jefferson Newbold of Boston, who was one of our oldest friends. He was somewhat younger than the President, and he and his parents were our next door neighbors in Hyde Park. He shared many of my husband's early campaign trips. Mr. Newbold's death will be mourned not only by his family and friends, but by his neighbors, for he was always a conscientious and helpful citizen of his community.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL