My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

HYDE PARK, Thursday—We still pant for rain around here, not even a shower has come to soften our ground. However, some very lovely lettuce came in from the garden this morning, and by dint of almost incessant watering the grass and flowers around the cottage still look fresh.

I told you yesterday I would tell you a little more about the luncheon for the Governors' Conference. They began to arrive a little before 1:00 o'clock and the luncheon was held out under the trees near the big house. As usual, on these occasions many Governors brought members of their families, and I found to my pleasure that there were a number of familiar faces. Governor and Mrs. Hoey of North Carolina and Governor Cooper of Tennessee were among our old friends. The latter remembered our last meeting in Johnson City and was just as nice as possible. I could go on for a long time, but I think I will just add that my mother-in-law gave us all a very good lunch, which was made pleasanter by the cool breeze blowing up the river. In one way, however, this was a disadvantage, for Governor Lehman, who sat at my table, found the little vase of flowers that decorated it blown into his lap. There was so little water in it, that I don't think he was very wet. Much the same thing happened at one of the tables where some children sat, for I saw my aunt, Mrs. David Gray, get up and go over to supervise some mopping up.

It was nice to see Governor and Mrs. Maybank of South Carolina, and I was glad to have an opportunity to introduce Mr. and Mrs. Gray to them because they have a mutual friend, Mrs. George Huntington, who lives in Charleston part of every year. David Gray found himself at home at once when he discovered Governor Winship, for I think they were classmates and that seems to make an unbreakable bond.

After lunch, I took those who wished to go, into the big library to point out the chief family heirloom, the Gilbert Stuart portrait of the President's great-great grandfather, who was a friend of Alexander Hamilton, and sat in the Constitutional Convention at Poughkeepsie, when, after much discussion, New York State finally ratified the Constitution.

I cannot say that I feel very happy about the news which the papers bring us from abroad. It seems almost unbelievable that any leader would be willing to risk war at a time like this, and yet a responsible correspondent in the Herald-Tribune this morning seems to intimate that this is the case where one European leader is concerned. How short are men's memories when they do not realize that one small hostile action may bring the debacle and involve a whole continent.

I am particularly glad to see that an amendment was adopted in the Senate to the relief bill which gives hope that certain of the white collar projects, such as the Theatre and Art projects, may continue even in a limited fashion.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL