My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Sunday—I would have to be a really good society reporter adequately to describe two of the parties that I have been to since I last wrote on Friday.

After the rehearsal on Friday afternoon for Margie Delano's wedding, her aunt, Miss Laura Delano, had a dinner for all the young people and kindly included some of the older relatives. My mother-in-law and I drove up together and, being of the older generation, we were the first to arrive. Miss Delano's house is small, but being fairly high it rejoices in one of the most beautiful views of the Catskill mountains which can be found in our neighborhood.

Down on her lawn she had a big tent put up, all the poles were garlanded in green. It looked like an extension of the garden and the moon shone to add a finishing touch. All the young things in their gay dresses and the boys in their summer evening clothes, made a really pretty picture. After the tables were taken away, three of the members of Haas' orchestra played while they danced. I reached home about 1:00 o'clock, but I imagine the young people can dance a good deal longer than I can look on.

The bridegroom's family was heartily welcomed to the Hudson River, but when a girl marries, I am afraid she leaves her allegiance to one part of the country and forms a new one for some other locality. For Friday evening, however, one would have thought we were preparing Drexel Paul's family to take up their residence on the Hudson.

Yesterday morning my husband arrived and after some rest, we started at 12:30 for the reception at Steen Valetje, the Delano home in Barrytown. It could not have been a more perfect day. Mr. and Mrs. Lyman Delano are among the best hosts I know, so everyone enjoyed themselves and the young couple must have felt that they started their married life under very auspicious circumstances. Many good wishes and hopes for a happy future were uttered to bring them good luck.

Late in the afternoon, some of the ushers and one bridesmaid with various other friends came back to our pool for a swim. After dinner at the big house, some of the young people who had been my mother-in-law's guests, left for New York City.

There is a cold wind and clouds are in the sky this morning, so one and all we pray for rain.

Yesterday my youngest grandson received a most charming sunsuit, designed and knitted by a woman in New York City. She is anxious to have an opportunity to give instruction in knitting, crochting, and embroidery in some of the better schools. I fear that there are not many schools where time can be found for these gentle arts. They are useful, however, and I have always been grateful to my grandmother who organized a class for us on Saturday mornings when I was a little girl, and made us learn to knit and sew. To be sure, the classes were supposed to have a two-fold aspect—we worked for poor children, but learning to do things with your hands is of use all your life.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL