My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Friday—It was quite a thrill yesterday afternoon to present for the second time to Miss Jacqueline Cochran, on the part of Colonel Kerwood, for the Ligue Internationale des Aviateurs, the trophy given to the best woman flyer every year. She looks so young, it hardly seems possible that she has done so many things and is such an outstanding pilot.

At lunch, I talked with a woman from Switzerland who has been travelling about our country by air and has gone as far south as Mexico and as far north as Seattle, Washington. I thought she might possibly be, like myself, just a passenger, but she told me that she is also a pilot. It made me just a little envious and I wished that the years could roll back and I could learn to fly!

Life is full of coincidences. When I found myself being introduced to Nancy Bird—an appropriate name of an aviatrix—and was told that she flew one of the Australian flying ambulances, I felt someone had rubbed Aladdin's wishing lamp for me. I was tremendously interested, for not long ago, in talking about the difficulties of reaching some of our isolated spots in this country, I had been told about this new service carried on in Australia and was anxious to hear about it.

After lunch, I stopped for a minute to listen to some youthful speakers taking part in a forum on youth problems. This was held under the auspices of the regional meeting of Democratic Women, which held its first day's session in New York City yesterday. From there, Mrs. Ernest Lindley and I went to the Columbia Playhouse to work on the broadcast which I gave last night with Kate Smith. It was fun to do this in the theatre with her, for when we did one before, I was in Washington and she was in New York City, which did not seem satisfactory. She has a warm personality and I can well understand why she is such a favorite on the radio.

Last night I attended the dinner given for the members of the Democratic Regional Conference and heard Postmaster General James A. Farley make an excellent speech, as well as Miss Fannie Hurst, Mrs. Herbert Lehman and Lieutenant-Governor Poletti.

It was fortunate that it was cool, so we did not mind our night in town. As soon as I was finished with the dentist this morning, we started for the country. This time we did not leave Mrs. Morgenthau at the traffic light, where we picked her up yesterday, but took her home!

A further evidence of Queen Elizabeth's thoughtfulness has just come to me in a telegram from Sir Alan Lascelles. She forgot to tell me that she had worn her woolen dress at Hyde Park and found it delightful. This makes me realize that I have not told you that I found my woolen dress just as cool as any cotton or silk one and am going to enjoy it for months to come.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL