My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Wednesday—I am sure that everyone of us read with supreme relief this afternoon that seven men have been rescued from the submarine "Squalus." I cannot help thinking of the women and children waiting for each trip made by this bell. I can imagine all the heartrending human stories which play themselves out as these people wait and watch. All one can do is to pray and hope that, for all of them, there will come before long, a happy reunion with the men still on board.

Mrs. Morgenthau and I spent a most interesting day at the New York World's Fair yesterday. It was Rural Women's Day, but my part did not begin until nearly 3:00 o'clock, so, in the morning, we went first to the General Motors Building and my friend, Mr. Frank Harting, took us on a little trip around the world of the future. He wrote the script which synchronizes with the music and the scene which passes before your eyes and is justly proud of the whole exhibition.

This world of tomorrow is, of course, primarily designed to show how highways and automobiles are going to function. But there is real imagination here, and one can get some real inspiration in social planning and in a vision of what the world of tomorrow may possibly mean in happiness and well-being for all of our people. Mr. Norman Bel Geddes has my appreciation and thanks for a grand show.

We went through the rest of the exhibit rather hurriedly, for at 12:15 I was due at the Aviation Building and there Jacqueline Cochran presented me with a plaque from the four big airlines, as their foremost woman air traveller. Of course, I received this title only because of the fact that I am the President's wife, for many other people have travelled many more miles and probably to more useful purpose. Few, however, I am sure, are more interested in aviation and its possibilities in the future. The exhibition is still unfinished, but I saw the plans for both the military and the civil exhibition. I hope that the need for military use will grow less as the years go on, but that the various new uses which are the peaceful works of man may constantly develop. For instance, I am particularly interested in the control by air of such things as the migration of grasshoppers, locusts, etc., which devastate such vast areas in a short time.

We lunched at the Swedish Restaurant and I went through their exhibition. On the whole, I think we are planning our housing as well as they are, but we have much to learn from the Scandinavian countries in their general social planning.

I attended the Rural Women's program for an hour and a half and returned to New York City for the evening, since the weather was none too auspicious. We flew back to Washington this morning.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL