My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

NEW YORK, Monday —I arrived at New York City rather late last night, having waited to have supper with my husband and my guests in Washington. We had a very pleasant drive in the afternoon to Annapolis, my first glimpse of the Academy this year. The view from Bancroft Hall out to sea, with all the little sailing ships tacking back and forth, is a sight to be remembered.

My husband used to say that these boys never had a chance to really to learn to sail at the Academy, but judging by the sight yesterday afternoon, they must be doing a great deal of sailing.

Admiral and Mrs. Brown gave us tea and let us have a glimpse of their garden. I hope the youngster who was with us will think more of John Paul Jones after seeing his final resting place in the crypt of the Chapel, and that the flag with: "Don't give up the ship" on it, will make that particular incident in our naval history an unforgetable one.

Today has been spent at the New York World's Fair. Mrs. Helm, Miss Lape, Miss Thompson and I got out there about 11:30 and found our way to the Trylon and went inside the Perisphere. I did not feel that, as yet, one saw a very clear picture of the world of tomorrow. There was more space in the city and it did seem to merge more easily with the country, but I am sure in the world of tomorrow our airplanes will have changed and there will be many more inventions than are suggested by the present projection in the perisphere.

Then we got into what I like to call the "buses with the musical horns" and progressed to the Federal Building. I want to spend a long time in that building someday. On these visits, when I have a limited amount of time, I am not trying really to see it, though Mr. Flynn was kind enough to ask us to come over.

We did spend some time in the Norwegian Pavilion. They have a round rug in the lobby which, in color, is one of the most attractive things I have seen in a long time. I was particularly impressed by their enamel work and must go back someday and have a really good look at the different handcraft articles they have on exhibition.

From there I went to the luncheon for Brooklyn Day. Mrs. William H. Good was in charge and had asked me to be one of her guests today, for this was Women's Day. Afterwards we went to the National Advisory Committee Building, where four little girls in Dutch costume presented me with a particular variety of tulip named after me last year. Mr. Grover Whalen greeted me before an informal reception was held.

Then to the British Pavilion for tea and to hear their very excellent Coldstream Guards Band play "The Star Spangled Banner" and "God Save The King" in most inspiring fashion.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL