My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON—Luncheon yesterday was given up to two groups of young people, the high school graduates from Arthurdale, W. Va., and a group of history students brought over by Miss Julia Parker, a friend of mine from Hyde Park, who is teaching in a Baltimore, Md., school.

Every time we enter the State Dining Room now, I feel I must explain about the new Lincoln portrait. I don't have to draw people's attention to it, for it dominates the whole room and is so well lighted that your attention focuses at once on the beautiful head. The expression is different from any other portrait of President Lincoln which I know. I delivered a little lecture on the historical interest and association of the various rooms and led my charges through the rooms on the second floor, where I turned them over to a guide for inspection of the executive officies.

Two appointments in the afternoon, before a small tea for the Administration Council for the National Society for Crippled Children. Thirty States were represented, which I think is quite remarkable when you realize that this work is done entirely on a voluntary basis. Later, the executive board of the National Women's Trade Union League came in for tea and I was very happy to see some of my friends whom I had not seen for a long time.

We gathered together some old newspaper friends last night at dinner, for Mr. and Mrs. Walter Brown of Albany, N.Y., with their two boys, are spending the weekend with us. After dinner they had a movie, "Juarez" which sounded most exciting, but Miss Thompson made me work on an article, which we managed to more or less finish with the sound of a movie in the distance.

A grand ride this morning, and this afternoon I am taking my guests over to Annapolis, for I think boys always enjoy seeing the Naval Academy.

Our horses discovered a new hazard on the bridle path the other day. The airport has an enormous pipe through which the sand is being sucked out and the noise can be heard for some distance. I thought our horses would be seriously troubled. Instead, they simply looked with interest and walked on. This morning, however, there was no noise, no men working, no places where water was spouting out and both horses looked with real suspicion at the change and I think were really more curious than when everything was in action.

This is Mother's Day and I have received a number of telegrams. Among other things, I have been asked to draw your attention to the American Mothers' Declaration. Mrs. Carrie Chapman Catt is extremely interested in getting American mothers to sign this pledge in order to present the signatures to the Court of Peace at the World's Fair. I am sure that anything that Mrs. Catt believes in will prove valuable to the women of this country and I am happy to have this day mean more in a civic way.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL