My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Friday—We were a bit hurried after we reached Worcester, Mass., yesterday afternoon. To begin with, I was a little late in arriving. It hadn't occurred to me that I would find some people waiting outside in the rain, together with several policemen, and an agitated group of ladies within the hotel doorway. Such was the case, however, but the ladies were very sweet about my tardiness.

We had a hasty press conference and then, on being told that we would go to the broadcasting studio, I remembered that I still was wearing a plain blue beret and had left my hat in the car. Frantically I be sought a gentleman outside my door to retrieve my hat before we started. He succeeded in doing so and I looked a little less like the "lady from the country."

This particular broadcasting studio is unique in many ways. It is in a lovely old house and is run by a young and attractive lady. She interviewed me for ten minutes on the radio and, when we came out of the studio, several Girl Scouts had gathered at the gate, so the usual pleas for autographs began. By limiting the signatures to Girl Scouts only, we were able to proceed without too much delay and found ourselves back at the hotel with an hour and a quarter to dress and eat our dinner.

At 8:00 o'clock we left and made a stop at the home for blind men on the way to the auditorium. There did not seem to be a very large group there, but I was especially interested in two men with seeing eye dogs. One man told me he had his dog for nine years and never had bumped into anyone or anything. They seem the most friendly and gentle dogs, and I think the constant human companionship must have a good effect on their dispositions.

One amusing incident occurred on our drive up. I had come through a town and was horribly conscious of the fact that I had driven in a stupid fashion and stalled my car at a cross-section, but I did not think I had done anything wrong. Suddenly, a red car driven by someone in uniform shot past me. It pulled up in front of me and the driver waved me to stop. My heart sank and I thought: "Well, I unconsciously ran through a red light in New Haven once, I have probably done the same thing here. "I prepared myself for a humble apology. Instead, a very agreeable gentleman came up to me and said: "I was sitting on the fire truck when you went by and told the boys I knew it was the President's wife. I thought it was better to catch up and find out than to be sorry afterwards." I signed an autograph and went on my way much relieved.

We left the hotel this morning at 7:00 o'clock and if the sun had shone, I could say we had a perfect trip. But, even now, the sun is still hidden behind the clouds and the trees still look like November instead of the end of April.

I have just a few hours in the cottage at Hyde Park to catch up on mail and do a few necessary things before our guests arrive at the big house.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL