My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK City, Sunday—Johnny and Anne tried to met us at the airport in Boston on Friday night, but missed us by about ten minutes because our plane was added as a second section, so to speak, on account of the amount of air travel to Boston and arrived a little ahead of schedule. However, they caught up with us at the hotel.

I must say that our youngest son has one very comforting capacity. He can attend to an infinite number of details with calm and quiet efficiency and give you no feeling of hurry or excitement. I finally sent them home a little before 1:00 a.m., but he was back Saturday morning at 9:30 and we all went out to see, my nephew, Danny's family in Dedham.

Mrs. Theodore Douglas Robinson, who is one of Danny's mother's most intimate friends, has just arrived in England, but her three daughters came up to Boston yesterday. I think one of her daughters, Mrs. John Hinckley, showed great courage. She had a fall recently and broke her foot and is on crutches, but she gets about everywhere very cheerfully, and seemed to think that a trip from Washington, D. C., by train under those circumstances was really no effort.

So many of us exaggerate our own feelings and allow our personal disabilities to prevent us from doing things which might be helpful or considerate in times of stress, that I am always impressed when the younger generation shows complete forgetfulness of itself in any crisis. We should all strive for this attitude, but it is sometimes hard to achieve.

Many other members of the family, both young and old, were present yesterday, together with Danny's club mates and college friends who came in great number.

My brother and I, together with Franklin, Jr., who had arrived from Charlottesville, Va., in time for the funeral, flew back on a late afternoon plane to New York City. Franklin, Jr., went on by plane to Washington. I stayed in New York City in order to go today to Arden, N. Y., for "Pete" Rumsey's funeral. His mother was one of my very dear friends, and one hopes that the reasons for the tragedies in this world are clear to those who have entered on the adventure of the next.

After my return from Arden, Miss Thompson and I are taking the evening train to Washington, where tomorrow the daily round will begin again. The next few weeks promise to be fairly busy.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL