My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Friday—Not until just outside of Newark, N. J., yesterday afternoon, did we encounter any really bad weather. We had a slight flurry of snow Wednesday night, a beautiful sunrise as we came into Fargo, N. D., through a bed of fleecy clouds into fog, a slight snowstorm in Minneapolis, Minn., and good weather in Chicago. That is the log of my trip so far as the weather goes!

In Minneapolis the press was particularly wide awake, it being fairly early in the morning. However, they did allow me to wash my face and hands and comb my hair before they asked me to be photographed!

First I stood with a very attractive young woman who carried a sweet youngster dressed entirely in blue. Then, they evidently thought contrast was what was needed, so, while they told me that the baby was taking her third trip by air, they discovered an elderly lady who was starting for Denver, Col., on her first trip, and they asked us to sit together for a photograph.

I was glad to do this, for she had a most interesting face. I discovered that she had been away from home for two years, evidently dividing her time with different members of her family. Her last visit had been in the South, after which she stopped with her sister in Minneapolis. Now she had made up her mind that travelling by air would be easier than a long train trip for a person who walked with a cane and had arthritis, and was going home to her daughter in Colorado that way. Her sister leaned over us while we talked and said: "If I were taking this trip, I wouldn't have slept for a week, but my sister isn't afraid of anything." The expression on her old face looked as though that were true. There was something dauntless in her face which made me think she had lived an interesting life and was courageously taking whatever might be today's lot.

It does seem wonderful to cross the continent in an airplane and come in a few minutes ahead of schedule, which was what I did. Back at my apartment, in New York City, Miss Thompson and I spent a long evening over the mail.

My engagement book for the next few months has reached a point where I think I shall have to say "No" to any request, for I can't see how I can squeeze another thing into the days which lie ahead of me.

Most of my day today has been spent in trying on spring and summer clothes. I also saw, what was, I thought, a very large group of the press and photographers in June Hamilton Rhodes' office, where I told the story of the woolen material which the American wool growers are giving to the Queen of England, and the wool growers of the Dominion are giving to me. This reciprocal gift is made so that we may both meet in perfect comfort in sheer woolen dresses on the 8th of June in the City of Washington, D. C. I am hoping for a cool day!

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL