My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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LOS ANGELES, Wednesday—Lack of space prevented my telling you yesterday of the most beautiful time at the San Francisco Fair. If you can do nothing else, be sure to take a wheelchair and roll around after the lights are lit. Go from court to court, get all the reflections in the water and all the different colors in the fountains. The Pillars of the Forty-Eight States, at the Federal Building, are striking but not beautiful in the daytime, as are the murals, but at night the effect is breathtaking. Going around the little lagoon, where the paper lanterns hang over the water, is as charming a sight as I ever hope to see! I tore myself away around 10:00 o'clock, but could easily have spent even longer gazing at one vista after another.

Anyone coming to San Francisco, should remember that summer or winter, you need a very warm coat in the evening and that San Francisco climate is almost the same in June as in December.

Yesterday morning I went back and, through the kindness of the Fair officials, was allowed to see some of the exhibitions which are not open to the public until later in the day. So, with great comfort, we saw the Indian Courts again. I was deeply impressed by the attitude of the Indians themselves. They have had a share in this exhibition and they are very happy over the result and proud to show some of their most beautiful work. They rarely offer their really good handwork for sale to people of other races, because they are conscious of the fact that the vast majority of people who visit their reservations or shops where Indian goods are sold, are very poor judges of the work they do and are only in search of cheap souvenirs. The best of their work is shown here. A big basket, rugs, tiles, etc., shown in a room, furnished with modern furniture, prove how well these Indian things are adapted to modern living. It took six years to make this basket, another one I looked at took a whole year and is beautiful in design as well as in workmanship. This whole Indian exhibition is really thrilling.

I visited the Pacific Building, with its marvellous maps made by Covarrubias, and the Fine Arts Building. The Western States Exhibition and as many foreign exhibits as I could see, took up the rest of our time in the morning. We lunched with Mr. George Creel and Mr. Leland Cutler and then had a short time left to visit the Chinese Quarter and later Mr. Gump's beautiful shop, which is more like a museum. Mr. Livingston Gump, himself, showed us his priceless jade and I wished my mother-in-law might have been with us, for she would have been able to appreciate it fully.

Back at the hotel, the NYA Advisory Committee came to see me and afterwards some of the Democratic State Committee women. We left in the early evening and reached this "City of Sunshine" this morning, but regrettably a gray cloud hangs over it. I feel personally responsible, because, unfortunately, this is the type of weather I have encountered before in Los Angeles.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL