My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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EDINBURG, Texas, Wednesday—Yesterday evening in Houston I was a little afraid that it would be difficult to make our train, but I need not have worried. The hotel took charge of our bags, our coats and hats, and they were on the train when we boarded it. Mrs. William Clayton, who introduced me at the lecture, took us to the station.

It is a little confusing to find your way around backstage at their new, attractive auditorium. Mr. Clayton and I tried several doors which were locked, and finally decided it would be easier to go to the front of the stage and out the main entrance. Behind us came Mrs. Clayton and Miss Thompson. I heard murmurs to the effect that we would never get through the crowd. During the last few years, however, I have acquired an eel-like quality and can slip through almost anywhere, because people are kind enough to let me go by. Of course, when the state or local police open up a passageway for me, there is a great deal more excitement entailed, but I can progress very quickly by myself.

When Mr. Clayton and I were outside, we realized that our two followers were lost to view. In a few minutes, Mrs. Clayton and Miss Thompson appeared saying: "You go right ahead and we will catch up," so we found the car and were soon joined by them. There was quite a traffic jam and I was amused by Mr. Clayton who requested a young boy in uniform to: "Please go behind and just see that I don't run over anyone as I back out." With the aid of the young man we were quickly out of the crowd, reached the station in ample time, and left without further delay.

Today, so far as vegetation goes, we might be in Southern California or in Florida. Mayor Brown of Edinburg tells me that this town is only about 15 years old. They are particularly proud of their school system. A consolidated school uses 29 buses to bring in children from the valley round about. They are giving good vocational courses and the schoolboys themselves keep the buses in running order and thereby gain some practical training in mechanics.

I do not think I have ever seen flowers more tastefully arranged than they are in our rooms today. One particular little attention is much appreciated. All the wild flowers are carefully labelled so that a stranger may know their names as well as admire their beauty.

At breakfast we had the most delicious grapefruit I have ever tasted, pale pink in color and sweet without the addition of sugar. They tell me that the valley is about 18 miles wide and 65 miles long. Their chief products are citrus fruits and vegetables. This is my first visit in this section of Texas and I am looking forward to a drive this afternoon in which I can get an idea of the country and at the same time see some of the work which has been carried on in the locality under Federal, State and local auspices.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL