My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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FORT WORTH, Texas, Sunday—I have just finished a 1938 "first novel" prize winner, called: "Young Dr. Galahad," by Elizabeth Seifert. She does not describe a very charming community, but I am afraid it is an accurate description of a good many places and a good many people. Perhaps it is better to recognize facts than to let them thrive because they are unknown and unnnoticed.

We were late in arriving at Albilene, Texas, on Friday night, but even the crowd at the station was kind and considerate. We were whisked quickly to the hotel and had ample time to dress and dine before going to the lecture, which was in the auditorium of Hardin-Simmons University.

For travellers like myself, I would like to say a word about the comfort and good service of the Texas hotels. Almost every where that we have been, we have had good food, good accomodations and kindly interested service.

After the lecture Friday night, we went to the Chamber of Commerce Building where they have an exhibition showing West Texas products, developed and undeveloped natural resources, and the possibilties for industrial expansion. It is interesting to see the accomplishments, but, to me, it far more interesting to see the many developments which wait for future enterprise. It seems a pity one cannot bring together the money and the people who need employment throughout the country to develop some of these resources.

This is a cowboy country. Even in the cities they are conscious of the pictureesqueness of this part of their population. Bellboys in the hotels are dressed as cowboys and the Texas Cowboy Band, which has travelled widely in this country and Europe, played in a truly inspiring way before the lecture. This band is going to the San Francisco Fair in May and will be in New York City at the Fair in June, and I am sure they will draw big crowds in both places.

Saturday morning, before leaving, we paid our respects to the 71-year old president of the university, Mr. Jefferson Davis Sandefer, who was too ill to attend my lecture Friday night. Thirty years of his life have been given to the development of this university and it must be a satisfaction to him to realize in what high esteem his fellow townsmen hold him.

Tomorrow, March 13th, is the publication date for Mrs. Woodrow Wilson's memoirs. The gaps left in the magazine articles will be filled in the book, which will be a satisfaction to all those interested in this period of history and anxious to gain information from every possible angle. This is a very personal book, written from the point of view of a woman who looked at life and all its contacts from the personal angle. It will prove enlightening to many people.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL