My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Tuesday—The weather is in conspiracy against me, for when I am so busy that I can't possibly go out, the sun shines, and when I have two hours free and plan to go out for a ride, the rain comes down in torrents! I was completely disgusted this morning to awake to the patter of rain on the roof below my window. But then, nothing is ever entirely bad, for this has given me much more free time to do a number of things which I should do.

My brother, looking extremely fit and full of pep, appeared for breakfast and was much amused when Mrs. Nesbitt, the housekeeper, came up to show me the menu for lunch and my housekeeping for the day took about three minutes. As she left, however, she asked me if I would please come down to look at a set of rugs before the house was open to visitors. Several rooms on the second floor need new rugs and, as usual, the argument goes on—shall one buy one expensive rug at a time with the knowledge that it will last longer, or shall we get inexpensive rugs which will make the rooms look fresher and brighter, but which will have to be replaced very much sooner. We are deciding, I think, on the more expensive type of rugs and are buying only one at a time. I looked at some yesterday and some today and will see more the end of the week. Unfortunately, I always like the most expensive ones!

The four big double bed matresses and springs are being done over because my family informed me how very uncomfortable they were. I only hope they will return in such good condition that, from now on, every guest will enjoy a good night's rest.

I am particularly interested now in the possibility of peace between the two factions of labor. This rift has undoubtedly harmed both labor and business. I have never been quite able to understand why there could not be more flexibility in these big organizations which would allow certain groups to organize in one way, and others, if they preferred, in another. This should not preclude unity on basic interests which are important to all groups in the working world. When organized labor is really such a small percentage of labor as a whole, I feel that it cannot afford to be divided without losing some of the strength of its leadership.

In New York State I understand that there are a number of bills being introduced in the legislature to include domestic workers under the Social Security Act and the Wages and Hours Law. I hope that farm labor will also be included wherever possible. Other countries seem to manage to do it through the use of stamps. Perhaps that method might also simplify for us the difficulties of administration which have, in the past, always precluded the inclusion of these two groups of labor under any of these measures.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL