My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK City, Monday—There is a book of poems called, "Brief Pageantry," which I have just received, written by a young girl, Jehanne De Mare. She used to be at the Todhunter School, so Miss Dickerman is particularly interested. In addition, there is a portrait of the author by one of Miss Dickerman's other graduates, Andrea Dowd, which illustrates the notice which accompanies the book. It is a great satisfaction and interest when young people, whom you watched develop, begin to do creative work of their own.

I am very much interested to see there is a proposal by groups of dentists to arrange for yearly care of the patients. Yesterday, I noticed that in Utah, a group is offering a plan by which the average cost for any adult is set at ten dollars a year. It seems to me that is particularly valuable, for care of the teeth is something which should be done regularly. So many people lose their teeth at an early age through lack of care, and false teeth cost a good deal of of money and never seem to be as pleasant as one's own.

I was visited at Hyde Park by a number of my neighbors and I went visiting both days. I am very much pleased by the energy with which some of the young men are establishing a small business. I still believe that small factories may make a go of it in rural districts and thus give added employment—especially to young people. I, therefore, watch each thing which is done by these young families in Hyde Park with a great deal of interest.

I have found that there is a better market for the heavy homespuns which can be used in men's overcoats and outdoor sports clothes than for the lighter, less tightly woven materials. I used to be told that our climate was not cold enough to warrant the use of heavy tweeds such as you buy in Scotland and Ireland. In addition, our people are not supposed to like materials which last a lifetime. However, I find that my son is still attached to a tweed suit which belonged to his grandfather, and I see no reason for such sentiment being devoted only to foreign made materials. I hope that in the weaving shop here, we will produce some rather heavier homespun, similar to that which is being made in some of the projects for hand weaving.

I paid a visit to a baby who lives in the house half way down our lane, yesterday. There is no doubt about it that if you like little babies, they have great charm during the first twelve months of their lives. Most of the men I know, prefer them when they are more active. Perhaps the reason is that they only have to take care of them a short time every day, whereas the mother or the nurse has to be constantly on the run when they begin to walk.

I am on my way to Philadelphia, where I speak at a luncheon and then take part in a forum before I return to Washington tonight.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL