My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Thursday—A number of appointments yesterday afternoon and some guests for dinner, after which I went to the Whyte Gallery on H Street to see Jo Davidson's exhibition of work which he did in Spain. I think all his work is interesting and I like the bust which he did of the President better than any of the other heads which have been done of him, but there is an additional interest in this exhibition because of the variety of the types which are shown.

I was particularly interested in the miner's wife, whose two daughters I was told had died of starvation. There is tremendous strength in the head and face, but instead of the bitterness which one might expect, I think there is an expression of great kindness and understanding, something unmistakably maternal about the woman.

Great interest was being shown in the medium which he had used to do the head of the woman who handles foreign correspondence and press relations in general for the Spanish Government. It is interesting as a medium, but so new to me that I could not decide whether I liked it or not.

A press conference this morning at which Miss Katharine Lenroot and Dr. Martha Eliot of the Children's Bureau came to tell us something about the results of the maternity and infancy program under the Social Security Act. Mrs. Linda Littlejohn of Australia was also present and contributed some interesting facts on work done in Australia and New Zealand. An appointment afterwards, and then a delightful luncheon given at the Women's National Democratic Club by Mrs. Swanson, wife of the Secretary of the Navy.

We are very much disappointed because we had hoped to have Governor and Mrs. Herbert Lehman with us tonight at dinner and the judicial reception, but they are held in New York City by colds. I was looking forward to hearing about many of our friends in New York State, who undoubtedly attended the Governor's inauguration, and still hope I will, for we are to have the pleasure of Judge and Mrs. Irving Lehman's company. We hope the colds which have kept the Governor and Mrs. Lehman away will not confine them to bed for long. We all know what it means to be laid up at this season with the knowledge that work is piling up and must at some time be done. The feeling that you are laying up long hours of work for yourself makes it very difficult to retain the frame of mind which is conducive to a rapid recovery.

The appointments to the Supreme Court and to the board of the Tennessee Valley Authority have been made today. I imagine that both appointments will be praised and attacked as all appointments must be, for, of course, some people are always disappointed while others are pleased. I think, however, few people, will doubt the ability of either of the men to do the work which will be required of them, and after all that is the most important thing to be considered.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL