My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Tuesday—Yesterday afternoon, John, Anne and I flew over to New York City where Franklin, Jr., and Ethel joined us. We all had dinner together and went to the theatre before the boys went back to work by night trains.

I have so much to tell you today that I will not say anything about the play, but I shall try to do that tomorrow. In the meantime I want to say something on a subject that has been on my mind for some time.

Parent's Magazine is now giving each year an award which they call the "Youth Service Gold Medal," and with the medal goes a check for one hundred dollars. In the opinion of the committee, which consists of Miss Mary Jeanne McKay, President of the National Student Federation of America; Mr. William W. Hinckley, Chairman of the National Council of the American Youth Congress; and Mrs. Clara Savage Littledale, editor of the magazine; the young person receiving this award is judged to have rendered the greatest service to the cause of American youth during the past year.

This year, as recipient of the award, they have chosen Mr. Joseph Cadden, who was Chairman of the Committee on Arrangements for the World Youth Congress which met here last summer. In the statement which the magazine has given out, is said: "The fact that 700 young people from 54 countries came together and discussed with friendliness and tolerance problems of unemployment and education, recreation and legislation affecting young people and, above all, how best to serve peace and further international understanding in a troubled world, made the World Youth Congress an outstanding event in the annals of youth."

Having watched the Congress with considerable care, and read over the record of the resolutions passed, and knowing many of the young people who attended, I cannot help being glad that recognition has come to a young man I feel is unselfishly interested in trying to help his generation solve its own problems and the problems facing this country and the world at large.

On this visit I have only tried to see some members of my family, for I had to dash back to Washington immediately since we have tonight one of our largest and most important state dinners. I am happy to say that my mother-in-law is spending this whole week with us and will therefore be able to attend the diplomatic dinner, in which she is greatly interested. Having lived abroad a great deal of her life, she always enjoys any meeting with the diplomatic corps. I know she will also enjoy the music this evening, for in spite of her years, she is young in her interests and enthusiasms. My children all say that "Granny" is in some ways younger than they are, which is perhaps the highest compliment the head of a family can receive.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL