My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WARM SPRINGS, Ga., Sunday—You couldn't ask for bluer skies nor brighter sunlight than we are enjoying today, but the temperature is very low for this part of the world. Those who are occupying houses with open fireplaces as the only heat, find rising in the morning and lighting the fire takes a great deal of character.

Our guest cottage depends entirely on open fires for heat and I was amused when someone was discussing the housing for two guests who are arriving today, to have them say: "Well the two people you have in your guest cottage now, are hardy Navy men trained to accept whatever discomfort come their way, but I think these visitors would find it difficult to accomodate themselves to such circumstances." So a kind gentleman with a very comfortable house is going to take our two new visitors in.

I am rather sorry that I cannot be in New York City tomorrow, for the Public Education Association is having a dinner meeting and the topic for discussion will be: "Education For American Life." They are considering the "Recommendations of the Regents Inquiry into the character and cost of public education in the State of New York." The Public Education Association has done much in my State to interest the people in questions which are vital to the future of the next generation. On this occasion I think their discussion will be of interest throughout the country. New York has every opportunity to do progressive work and every type of problem can be studied throughout the State.

Mr. Owen D. Young has been Chairman of the Regents Committee and no one could bring more interest and more practical experience to that position, for he has taken an active interest in the schools in his own rural district and in his industrial contacts he has had every opportunity to study the result of education as it is today.

New York State seems to be furnishing me with several things of interest just now, for I have a report before me on the third anniversary of the New York Federal Theatre Project. You may have thought that the difficulties on this project in New York have been so many that little could be accomplished. If so, it will interest you, as it did me, to find that in New York City, 4,202 people are employed by the Federal Theatre and, since this project first took form, 12,593, 872 people have seen Federal Theatre performances. That is quite a record and I congratulate the personnel and the supervisory staff.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL