My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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ALBANY, N.Y., Sunday—The weather has been so glorious I think everyone was delighted to have Armistice Day fall on Friday, so they could have an extra day's holiday. At the State College, where I spoke on Friday morning, I noticed that when the announcement was made that there would be no school that day, there was a general look of satisfaction on the faces of all the young people. A great many graduates had come back for the day and were standing at the back of the hall and I could not help thinking that this spoke well for the relationship which had been established between the teachers and their pupils.

Afterward, in driving over with the dean, Miss Moreland, to Schenectady, I was impressed to have her say quite naturally that she felt it was the natural thing for young people to bring their troubles and difficulties to their teachers after they had left school. It should be, but I doubt if it is!

We stopped at a very interesting crippled children's hospital and school on the way to Union College, where I lunched with the New York State Deans Association. Dean Bradshaw of Chapel Hill, North Carolina, gave a most interesting address stressing the point that education in this country must remain democratic. The President of the College recalled the fact that my husband's father had been one of the graduates of Union in the middle 1800's.

We left there about 3:30 and drove out to the county tuberculosis sanitarium so I could have a glimpse of a young girl who has been there for some time and who is gradually fighting her way back to health. Then we went to Albany for the closing hour of the NYA conference of the advisory committee. While there, I saw several friends, among them Mrs. Frederick Stuart Greene, who always attends everything of real interest which is going on here. She seems to me a very excellent example of the way in which a woman who does not hold public office, can make herself an influence in the community. In the years that I have been working in this State, I can think of nothing here in Albany really worthwhile where she has not been an important factor.

Yesterday and today have been spent catching up on mail. Miss Thompson and I have not been idle, though yesterday was too enticing not to be drawn out of doors now and then. Today is gray and I think rain or snow may be with us before long, but I hope to get a good walk before the weather makes it impossible.

One of the things which happens to me is that I sometimes start a book, am much interested and then have to lay it aside to read things which are really necessary. This was the case with Irene Kuhn's "Assigned to Adventure," which I am just finishing. My daughter told me that she had enjoyed every word of it and I have found it equally delightful.

Tomorrow we are off for Cincinnati and spend two days in Ohio.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL