My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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ALBANY, N.Y., Friday—I went down to the station to see the President off for Washington at 1:00 o'clock. Little Diana Hopkins, who was going through to Washington with her father, settled herself comfortably in a chair opposite the President in the observation end of the car. After carefully seating her doll in a comfortable corner, well covered up so the draughts would not disturb her, she seemed to feel all her responsibilities were over and she could relax.

In saying goodbye to Diana, I told her that I was looking forward to the 23rd of December, when she would be with us again in the White House, and asked her if she had written her letter to Santa Claus. She looked at me wisely and said: "No, I think I will let it be a surprise because last year Santa Claus did not bring most of the things I asked for." That is a good philosophy to acquire at any age, but it seemed to me a little sad to have acquired it at six years!

In the afternoon, Miss Thompson and I journeyed to Albany, N. Y., laden down with six pieces of baggage which always go with us on even a short lecture trip, and we have four lectures next week.

The occasion for my being here in Albany is a meeting of the Advisory Committee of the National Youth Administration in New York State. Commissioner Mulrooney, who is the head of the State Advisory Committee, invited me to attend the sessions, to dine with them last night, and to speak at a meeting in Chancellors Hall.

Mr. Charles Taussig was the other speaker at the meeting. I was very much interested to hear him tell of the advancement made in the work of the National Advisory Committee and the success of their first regional committee meeting in Minneapolis, Minn.

The next meeting will be held in New Orleans La. I hope I may be able to attend it, for it is very interesting to hear the reports of the work done in the different states.

I try, of course, wherever I go, to familiarize myself with the program being carried on in the particular locality, for I agree with Commissioner Mulrooney who said to me last night: "We are fixed in our ways, there is little that can be done about us, but youth is in the development stage and that is where progress can be made."

The New York State program seems to me to have grown tremendously since the last meeting I attended and I felt like congratulating Mr. Karl Hesley on the good work he has accomplished.

Today is Armistice Day and I wish that on this day we could bring home to everyone in our country how fortunate we are to have no threat of war hanging immediately over our heads. In any direction that we turn our eyes, we see people who live in daily anxiety either because of the threat of war, or because one is actually going on. For what we are spared may the Lord make us truly thankful!

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL