My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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CINCINNATI, Tuesday—The day was quite lovely in Kalamazoo yesterday. After a brief stop at the hotel, I went out to the WPA practice house and lunched with the Mayor, the Superintendent of Schools and various other guests. These projects seem to be running along much the same lines everywhere and, on the whole, I think they are proving valuable and having good results. They are training both employer and employee to the realization that skilled work is of value and that standards on both sides can be raised with benefit to each party.

The audience at my lecture was large and there were a number of questions, but we had ample time to return to the hotel before taking the train at twelve-one. I always feel that it is rather a strain to wait for a late train with the knowledge that some of the members of the committee feel they must stay up to see you off. On this occasion, however, we became so interested in talking and sewing that I was quite surprised when the committee called to say they were ready to take us to the train.

We arrived in Cincinnati this morning and everything was most comfortably arranged for the broadcast for the Herald-Tribune Forum. I really regret not being there in person, but it was a pleasure to be able to participate over the air.

I am going to be back in this part of the world in November for a brief day or two, so we decided that it would be well to devote the rest of this day to catching up on work of various kinds.

In spite of the fact that I take no part in politics on these trips, one cannot help being conscious of the political stir about one, for everywhere one is met by posters advocating the election of one candidate or another, and announcements of rival political meetings. I have been following with considerable interest, of course, the increased number of women running for Congress in both political parties. One thing seems to stand out, the women of both parties, regular as they may be, seem to have special interests and, when they have they vote as independents.

The two women I know best in my own party, Caroline O'Day of New York and Nan Wood Honeyman of Oregon, seem to stand out because of their interest in social questions. Having this background, it is interesting to note that both of them have also had the courage to cling to principles which they considered right, even when certain people were trying to make it appear that the welfare of the masses lay in the advocacy of some extreme policy. Prehaps in the present campaign, Nan Honeyman, because she lives on the West Coast where extremists sometimes flourish, has had to risk more in proving her ability to stand on her own feet, to keep her head and be courageous enough not to give up her principles for any temporary advantage.

Naturally I look hopefully for the reelection of the women who have had the experience and have proved their ability to serve their constituents, and I shall welcome any additions to the ranks of women in Congress if they stand on their own feet and vote for what they believe.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL