My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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EN ROUTE TO KALAMAZOO, Mich., Monday—Today marks the beginning of National Hearing Week. During this week the American Society for the Hard of Hearing, Washington, D. C., is making an effort to interest people in the work which they carry on for the education of children and adults who suffer from impaired hearing. It is so often not understood that a child who seems stupid in school may only be a child who hears less well than other children. If adequate instruction can be given, many people may go through life with the ability, not only to provide for themselves, but to enjoy life.

Sunday is usually supposed to be a day of rest, but yesterday did not provide us with that amount of quiet time which you associate with churchgoing or contemplation. However, I met people to whom Christ's parable of the lost sheep would have been an understandable mandate.

I had a chance to talk to the supervisors of women's and professional projects in Nebraska and they painted for me the difficulties of the areas in which drought has been recurring for some seven or eight years. This was no academic discussion, for they know the human beings involved and would have to meet them again this morning.

In the early afternoon I visited an exhibition in the library. The work done on a number of NYA projects and one WPA braille project was shown. The resident projects for boys and girls are multiplying. In Nebraska, the girl's work has been largely on sewing projects with a number of related activities. It was pleasant to see the pride which these girls took in the work they had done. One of them was sent to get a coat which she had made and which turned out to be as well tailored a job as one could wish to see. Another had made herself a simple black velvet dress with really good lines.

During the afternoon I had the pleasure of meeting the Governor and his wife and a number of other distinguished people, and the manager of the hotel turned out to be an old friend whom we had met in Kansas on a previous trip.

Before I went to my lecture in the evening, I was invited to glance at the exhibition put on by the National Pest Control Conference. Having read a little while ago about the devastation which a pest of grasshoppers had created in some of our western counties, I felt that this group was tackling some really important problems.

At 12:47 a.m. we boarded the C.B. and Q. train for Chicago and, in spite of the speed of the "Zephyr," as it is called, we had a very comfortable night. In Chicago this morning, I had a glimpse of Mr. and Mrs. Howard Hunter and Mr. Harry Hopkins and then boarded this train which is taking us through a very beautiful part of Michigan. So far we have seen no signs of the blizzard and hope we do not run into it.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL