My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Thursday—The University of Virginia seems to have spread its cloak over other universities and colleges in that state. I was much interested in visiting Hollins College yesterday afternoon, to discover how much their campus reminded me of the view as one stands at the back of the University of Virginia library and looks down across the lawn in Charlottesville.

Hollins College was founded by a man who as far back as 1857 decided that in "the state of the world" as he observed it, women needed to have their minds trained in the same way and to the same extent as men. Therefore, he devoted his entire life to building up a college for women in the very charming surroundings outside of Roanoke.

The college remained in his family until a few years ago, when they deeded it to a self-perpetuating board of trustees. The main building appealed to me because of its beautiful woodwork and spacious rooms. It must be good for young women in particular, to spend some years in such an atmosphere. I must say that the 350 girls I saw flitting around, looked a very healthy, happy group.

Miss Randolph, who is the President of the College, is dignified and gracious. In the evening, when we gathered in the auditorium for my lecture, she presided over the meeting with a calmness which would have done credit to any gentleman.

Miss Thompson and I returned to Washington by night train and arrived at 6:45 this morning, which gave me a great deal of time before breakfast to catch up on various little things.

I had my last ride this morning until I return at the end of the month. I feel great indifference to the fact that the papers announce rain for tomorrow, knowing quite well I shall be on a train!

At lunch two people representing the World Youth Congress came to see me to tell me of their plans for the coming year. They have a three-fold program to launch in as many countries as possible on January 1st and this should keep the Geneva office force busy on organization from now on. In every country each group will have a definite program to work on for the coming year.

My daughter-in-law, Betsey, is giving a tea for the Red Cross this afternoon and Mrs. Morgenthau and I are going in to see how the younger generation runs these things. I am always so glad when a responsibility of this kind slides into the hands of a more youthful group.

As usual, on the last day before I start on a trip, quite a number of things seem to pile up to be done. Among other things, I am trying out some new clothes which are supposed to make it possible for a woman to travel anywhere with a minimum of baggage and yet always have the proper thing to wear. As my trip progresses, I will tell you how successful this wardrobe seems to be.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL