My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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NEW YORK, Wednesday—I wish I knew what sources the newspapers have for discovering my movements! I left Hyde Park yesterday morning, having only telephoned my son Franklin, Junior, the night before that I would go to Philadelphia yesterday. I had only three-quarters of an hour in New York City, so I went to the Women's Division of the Democratic State Committee and asked a friend to take my column and file it for me. Then I went straight to the Pennsylvania Station and boarded the train for Philadelphia.

When I reached Philadelphia, the news of my arrival had preceded me. Franklin, Junior, told me that the photographers had greeted him, on his arrival at the hospital in the morning, with the announcement that they knew I was coming! Here was I, thinking I was going to make a quiet call on my new grandson and his mother!

On the train I sat at lunch with a gentleman who told me of a place in Wisconsin where labor had been needed for improvements on a plant and they were unable to get it, because people refused to go off relief. I asked, of course, if this had been reported. Much effort has been made recently to make it possible for people to go off relief rolls for temporary jobs and get back without the old time delay. Formerly a man with a family did not dare take a job unless it looked reasonably permanent. He was afraid his family would starve before he could obtain possible additional necessary relief for them.

I was very glad to know of this instance and I shall certainly follow it through and find out the reason. I wish every citizen would report to Washington anything of this kind that comes to his attention. Only with help from individuals can a program of such magnitude as WPA be sure of working efficiently.

A crowd waited for me outside the Philadelphia hospital, just to say good morning. Then I went up to meet a young gentleman who seems already, at one week old, to have a decided personality. He shows clearly when he does not like anything. But he opened his blue eyes and lay in my arms very contentedly and went to sleep in the way all babies should, after his first show of temper. His mother looks and seems very well and I stayed until after dinner with them. I arrived back at my apartment here a little after 10 p.m.

This morning my brother came to breakfast with me on my porch. I have done some shopping today and, in spite of a lazy streak which has been asserting itself this summer, I am going up to our old house in 65th Street to straighten out some of our belongings, which sadly need attention.

At one o'clock I will be at Delmonico's to preside over a luncheon given by several women's organizations in honor of Miss Kerstin Hesselgren, a member of the Swedish Tercentenary Delegation to America and a member of the Swedish Parliament. She is also a member of the League of Nations Committee on the legal status of women.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL