My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Tuesday—I am gradually accumulating a collection of pottery from different parts of the country. The tea set, presented to me in the pottery shop in Blacksville, W. Va., reached me safely a few days ago, and the shade of blue against our pine wood panelling is really lovely. Another piece of pottery came to me from Ohio, a most spirited horse with some sweet little animals taking refuge around him.

I haven't quite grasped yet why the package in which it arrived bore a label: "Wind in the Willows." Whether this name refers to the color or the subject is still a mystery to me, but anyway I like it and it occupies a place of honor in my living room.

Two daughters of a friend of ours are staying with us. Their home is in California and I am afraid we teased them a great deal about the well known California habit of thinking their section of the country the only part of the United States where one can possibly live. It is a joy to play games with young people, and yesterday afternoon they all played a game in the pool which necessitated swimming under a whole line of legs. Great hilarity ensued all around, particularly when the larger people found it difficult to get through—and so upset the whole line.

We were just sitting down to another game last evening when Captain Reybold appeared. He starts for the west in a few days and it is a joy to see him again before he leaves.

This morning, after breakfast, I bade everybody goodby and started off for Philadelphia. I will get there in the early afternoon and I am quite excited at the thought of seeing this new grandchild and his mother and father. When I called up last evening to find out if it would be convenient for me to come, Franklin, Junior, said he was reading aloud, so I am going to pick out the most amusing book I have and take it with me. There are certain things which are doubly enjoyed when they are read aloud.

The real news, however, is that the baby is to be named Franklin D. Roosevelt, III. That will certainly please his grandfather.

In glancing through the newspapers yesterday I noticed a little item which seemed to me of great importance. So many people have believed that from the financial standpoint Puerto Rico had more problems to solve than any other part of the United States. This item announces that the revenues last year in the island have risen to the highest point they ever have attained. I hope this means greater prosperity for the mass of the Puerto Rican people. Better wages, better sanitation and better education will add much to the standard of living of the people as a whole.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL