My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Monday—Having written a special word for the Fourth of July, my usual diary is rather behind time, so I think I must go back a little and tell you of our visit from the Swedish Crown Princess. She was accompanied by the Swedish Minister and Mrs. Bostrom; Count Fersen Gyldenstolpe, Chamberlain of the Household; Miss Steuch, Lady-In-Waiting; Mr. George Summerlin, of the State Department; an American aide, Colonel Crane, and a maid.

My husband had his two aides, Captain Woodson and Colonel Watson, and the Crown Princess' American godchild, whom she had never seen, was brought down from Oneonta, New York, to meet her; so we made quite a party for tea. I had been told to be home at 4:15 and was horrified on driving in to see that the party had arrived a little ahead of time. To be late for royalty, is not being done, but, luckily, the President and my mother-in-law were the real hosts of the occasion, so I managed to slip in unnoticed and later to be presented. I made my apologies and they were all very polite in assuring me that they had arrived before time.

After tea, my husband asked if they would like to drive around to see a little of the neighborhood, so he drove his car and I drove mine and then our guests all went to have a rest. I returned to the cottage and worked for an hour and a half on the mail. We had a small dinner and movies afterwards.

On Saturday morning everyone slept late, but I, with visions of having no exercise, rose at 7:30 and rode, and then dashed back to prepare for the picnic. They all semed to enjoy the Sweish dishes which one of their compatriots who does weaving for us had prepared, and the American hot dogs, which my husband and I insisted they must sample—that being almost a national dish for pic nickers in this country.

The Crown Prince and Princess had brought the President and myself a most beautiful piece of Swedish glass with a ship in full sail engraved upon it. They also gave us their photographs and the Crown Princess presented one of herself to my mother-in-law. In addition, the Crown Princess gave many people who had served her small gifts, which were deeply appreciated and I know will always be treasured.

It is always a marvelous thing to me to see how thoughtful and kind people who spend their lives more or less on parade, manage to be. No one could have been simpler or more attractive than this particular royalty, and everyone with her seemed to have the same desire to think of others and make them enjoy themselves. It occurred to me, however, that it must be rather difficult to travel around with enough gifts for any contingency, and to vary them must require a great deal of imagination.

They all left us Saturday afternoon and yesterday morning the President started for Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. I have settled down to a period of complete hibernation. Bears, I understand, hibernate in winter, but I have decided to do so this summer.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL