My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Monday—Yesterday was a perfectly delightful day. In the first place, it was really warm and I had my first swim. That, in itself, should make almost any day. I know nothing more delightful than the feel of nice, cool water and the hot sun afterward. My daughter, son-in-law and I talked earnestly for two hours this morning while we motored through the countryside. After leaving them at the big house for a reunion with my mother-in-law and the two children, I went over to my cottage to pick up some soup to take to Mrs. Scheider in the hospital.

It is traditional that hospital food isn't good. It is merely the fact, I suppose, that so much of it is cooked in quantity. Anyone who runs a large establishment knows the difficulty of having good food for a great many people. In addition, the real trouble with hospital food is the lack of appetite on the part of the patients. Even after a week of being practically on ice and water, Mrs. Scheider will look at me and say she really isn't hungry and can't think of anything she would like.

My mother-in-law thinks her cook makes the best chicken broth in the world, so that was the first soup Mrs. Scheider had. Yesterday I took her beef soup and she was polite about it, but I didn't see that glint of real hunger one likes to discover in a convalescent.

At about 1:00 o'clock, my brother and several guests were already in the swimming pool and when I returned from the hospital at 1:30, they were beginning to feel extremely hungry. After lunch they returned to the sun and the pool and were joined by Anna and John and the children. I paid another short visit to the hospital and then came back to join them. They left about 6:00 p.m. and Mrs. Somerville and I tried to go over the mail hastily but, before I knew it, it was time for me to pick up my mother-in-law and John and start for Mr. and Mrs. Henry Morgenthau's, where we were to have supper.

Just as I was about to leave, the skies opened and the rain came down in torrents. We stopped at the hospital so that Anna and John could have a look at Mrs. Scheider. We must have made a ridiculous picture when we tried to gather our finery about us as we climbed in and out of the automobile. We were 15 minutes late for supper because we had to drive very slowly, for even the windshield wiper couldn't keep the glass clear enough for us to see the road ahead.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL