My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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REEDSVILLE, W. Va., Friday—Yesterday, after writing the column, we set forth and visited Scott's Run where a great many of my old friends still live in spite of the fact that all the buildings have been sold to a junk dealer. Just exactly what is going to happen to these people when their homes disappear I do not know, but I don't think they will find themselves in any worse condition.

I barely had time to tidy up before the first dinner served at the Arthurdale Inn was underway. I made myself most unpopular by arriving late because I had invited three gentlemen to come over to talk to me about some social service work they wished to continue in Scott's Run. The building they occupied was being torn down by the mine owners. A church fund had given them a certain sum of money and they had collected a little more, but not sufficient to build a real community house. They had hoped to have one in this community, which certainly needs something of the kind.

During dinner we were entertained by a very charming girl quartette, a male quartette and several other young people. This celebration was in the nature of a housewarming and we adjourned immediately afterwards to the school gymnasium. Here a program of square dancing by the Arthurdale community in general, singing by the school glee club, and music by the Arthurdale band, afforded everybody a great deal of pleasure. When we finally wended our way home about 11:00 o'clock, I think everybody was quite ready to go to bed.

I had forgotten that one duty still awaited me and, in a short time, the school principal, Mr. E. Grant Nine, appeared with the diplomas for the graduating class and I signed them. They can graduate quite as well without this signature, but it seems to add to their pleasure and so I have signed them for the past year or two. This is the first class which has spent its whole four years in the high school. The group's only disappointment is that one senior has been taken ill and will not be able to graduate with them.

Early this morning we met the President's train. Then Mrs. Morgenthau and I went with Mr. Floyd Cox, Superintendent of Schools in Monongalia County, to the dedication of the Negro high school near Morgantown. This is the only Negro high school building in this county. They have been hoping for one ever since a high school group first met in a room above an ice cream factory which had been donated for this purpose. With the cooperation of WPA, they finally have an adequate building in which they should do very good work, particularly if the entire community cooperates in the way which their attendance at the ceremonies this morning indicated.

We were back in time to meet the President at a luncheon given by faculty of the school. Then the school committee held a meeting and we adjourned to the gymnasium for the graduation ceremonies.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL