My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Monday—Soon after we returned from our ride on Sunday morning, it began to rain in earnest and I hoped it was doing the same thing in Hyde Park where rain is badly needed.

The Todhunter girls, with Miss Dickerman and Miss Goodwin, went with me to the airmail post-office, temporarily set up on Pennsylvania Avenue between 14th and 15th Streets. There is a large sleeper plane cozily parked beside the post-office. How they ever got it there is a marvel to me. I imagine many people will examine the berths food, service and the like, during this week.

I was presented with a large sheet of stamps. Mr. Vincent Burke, the Postmaster for the District of Columbia, seemed to think it was appropriate for me to receive them, but I know better. If they are not turned over to my husband, I am sure I will soon hear about it! Collectors never seem to have enough of whatever they collect and I really think one should be thankful when it is stamps, because they take up comparatively little space.

We were shown a model of one of the early airmail transports with a little open cockpit and one propeller. This industry has certainly made marvelous strides since those early days.

The Todhunter girls left for New York City in the afternoon and at 5:00 o'clock I received the ladies of the Texas Garden Clubs, who have been touring this vicinity. They brought with them Senator Alberto Salinas Carranza of Mexico, who came to extend a personal invitation to me to accompany the Garden Club to Mexico. Next year's annual meeting of the Garden Clubs of America is to be held in Arkansas, I believe, and they are planning on this trip to Mexico as a side trip.

In a very charming speech they explained they could bring me none of their flowers so, instead, they brought me a cake decorated with flowers made in varied colored icing made by one of their members. It is quite the most intricate and beautiful frosting I have ever seen. I kept it for supper when the President returned from his very wet two days on the boat, and put it in front of him so he could enjoy it before cutting it. I did not feel that anyone had any right to destroy so much work, but we couldn't keep it and it tasted very good.

Among other people, Mrs. J. Borden Harriman, Minister to Norway, had supper with us last night. I have never seen anyone more enthusiastic than she is about her experiences there. The ladies who have been envoys to Scandinavian countries seem to find them sympathetic. She has made a study of homecraft work which is extremely interesting and I think will be valuable to us in some of the efforts we are making to develop craft work in the rural homes of this country.

I left early this morning. While it was windy and very cool for this time of the year, it was nice to see the sun sparkling on the Potomac River.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL