My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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HYDE PARK, Sunday—Friday morning I tried to decide how many shrubs around my cottage had died during the winter, admired the little sprigs of lilies of the valley and the pansy plants which are coming up, and rebelled at the thought of having to start off for Syracuse in the middle of the day.

There were two members of the Delano family and Mrs. Johnston Redmond, from Tivoli, on the train, so the journey started off very pleasantly. Mrs. Redmond told me that she and Mrs. Howland Davis have put an old stone house in order on the newly opened 9G Road between Red Hook and Hudson. They are going to run a lunch and tea room there and will exhibit and sell antiques and Dutchess County products.

This is another outlet for those in the County who make things for sale. I am sure everything these two ladies do will be well done, so people will find good food awaiting them if they stop on their way to Albany or the western part of the State.

It is nice to know that the Women's Exchange in Rhinebeck, where one can obtain delicious home-made bread, cakes and sandwiches, as well as many other products, is going to be supplemented in this way. The clothes in which Miss Delano has taken so much personal interest in the Women's Exchange, can, of course, not be duplicated anywhere else. A new teahouse run by women of taste will add another pleasure to a trip up and down this beautiful River Road.

Incidentally, our Val-Kill furniture shop has opened a small showroom on Main Street in the village of Hyde Park, where furniture, pewter and woven articles are on display. If people stop at all the places which have good things to eat and good things to buy, their progress is going to be extremely slow. But then, we should develop a sense of leisure, particularly on our summer trips.

In Syracuse, our friend, Mr. Leo Casey, was waiting for me. We motored to his house where I dined and got ready for the lecture I delivered for the Harriet May Mills Memorial in the Art Museum. At the close of the lecture, I had an opportunity to look at a most interesting exhibit of international posters and a few of the ceramics for which this museum is famous. Miss Mundy's wax miniatures are also on exhibition and they are a very beautiful medium for this kind of work. I know of no one else who does these wax portraits quite so exquisitely.

Back on the train at 10:00 o'clock and Saturday morning found me getting off at Poughkeepsie at 4:00 o'clock standard time. I expected to be driven home quietly and silently and anticipated creeping into the house and having at least three hours sleep. Instead, my entire household met me. Such devotion is almost incredible, but I had some difficulty concealing the fact that it was not entirely welcome.

Instead of sleep, we breakfasted before 6:00 o'clock and I was urged ride shortly thereafter. The rest of the day, I am glad to say, was peaceful with plenty of time to deal with a tremendous accumulation of mail.

This is another lazy day with a gray sky. I hope it means rain, for the country needs it here.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL