My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

NEW YORK, Wednesday—I have heard how successful the World's Fair preview parade was from all who saw it. Now I learn that Mr. Grover Whalen is going up to the opening of the Apple Blossom Festival in Kingston, New York, on May 6th. Evidently his interest in the beautiful development of the grounds at the Fair site has brought about a general interest in anything in the neighborhood which may prove to be an added attraction to visitors who come to the fair.

Ulster County is an interesting county, with farms, mountain scenery and the old town of Kingston on the Hudson River. It has a rich historical heritage as well as beautiful scenery. The Apple Blossom Festival should also afford an opportunity to people from all over the country to see some of the old Dutch and Hugenot houses which will be open to the public.

Other parts of the country, notably Virginia and the South, have been opening their old houses to the public for many years. Perhaps necessity has driven them to do so, but I think there is also a spirit of hospitality and a desire to share the beauties with others.

In the North we are shyer and more reticent, but it will do us good, I think, to share our points of interest and beauty with neighbors from the West and South.

The Ulster County Apple Blossom Festival will last three days, May 6th, 7th and 8th. If you can not be there this year, remember, when you are coming to the New York World's Fair next year, to plan to see this Festival.

I think my young guests, the Children of Congressional Parents, had a very good time at their garden party yesterday afternoon. I had to urge them to be a little curious, for they seemed shy about wandering around and looking in at the windows. They were a delightful group of young people and the Marine Band never had a more appreciative audience. After talking with them, I retired under President Jackson's magnolia tree to receive a number of guests, among them Miss Thorne, who is in Washington acting in "Tobacco Road."

Jimmy and I had dinner on the South Porch, where a breath-taking view was opened before us. The Washington Monument gleamed white in the darkness, the fountain at the foot of the lawn threw up graceful sprays and the new moon looked down upon it all. A scent of roses and syringa wafted up from the garden to add to our enjoyment.

I worked at my desk after dinner and then Mrs. Scheider and I took the midnight train for New York. We were met at the station at 7:20 by my brother, who seems to consider that this is the normal hour for anyone to be up and out!

I am taking another lesson in voice this morning, in the hope that I may be able to master the technique of talking for a newsreel camera. So far, the results have been so appalling that I shudder whenever anyone tells me they have heard one of my efforts.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL