My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

Text Size: Small Text Normal Text Large Text Larger Text

WASHINGTON, Monday—We returned to the White House yesterday afternoon a few minutes before 6:00 o'clock. The people on the streets seemed to be in a holiday mood with plenty of time to watch our cavalcade go by and to wave a friendly greeting to the President.

Mrs. Frank Polk and Mrs. Charles Dana Gibson, with her niece, Miss Brand from England, came in to see us for a little while. Mrs. Gibson lives not far from Charlottesville and very kindly invited our law student son to have tea with her there. She recalled the days when my husband and the boys stopped to see her on the coast of Maine and, I gathered, practically ate her out of house and home!

She remarked that the modern generation is growing so big that one never knows when enough food has been supplied. I remember that on that cruise, every friend who fed the boys ashore decided they did not have enough to eat at sea, and the officers on the destroyer thought they had hollow legs! Perhaps the reason why the modern generation is so tall is because of the amount of food it consumes.

My brother said the other day, that boys and girls are growing taller in this generation and almost all of them tower over their fathers and mothers. This proves we have moved forward in the care and feeding of youngsters in cases where we are able to afford a good doctor's advice and the food and care he tells us our children should have.

A large group of young people from the Dalton School in New York City asked to be received yesterday afternoon. After tea, I spent a few minutes with them before going into the pool with Mrs. Charles Fayerweather and my cousin, Elizabeth Henderson.

Our only guest at supper was Mrs. Warren Robbins. When the President went to his study to work, we discussed her job, which should develop into a very useful service for the State Department. We are gradually building more and more embassies of our own in foreign countries and the diplomats who go from one place to another should be informed as to what they will find in their new quarters and what they will need to take with them. The description of the way the records are being kept interested me particularly. Every piece of furniture, every hanging, is listed in a book with a sample of the material, the place it was bought and the price, so that ten years from now it will be possible to trace these furnishings with accuracy.

I ride every morning now before breakfast and find a number of other people have discovered how pleasant the bridle path is in the early hours and how delicious the air feels before the whole world surrounds you. Some people seem to ride even earlier than I do, for I met three people coming home as I was going out this morning.

A press conference this morning, and lunch with the Congressional Club ladies, always a pleasant party. Mr. Bentonelli, who sang for us earlier this year at the White House, gave us a delightful program. His accompanist is an artist and the combination is a joy to the audience.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL