My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Tuesday—Last night the President returned in time for dinner from the ball game, which he had enjoyed in spite of the rain. The rain had wet the children playing on the White House lawn, but we had ceased to worry because we could do nothing about it. I was told in a perfectly matter of fact way, that 140 children had been lost and found during the day and a number had been treated at the first-aid stations for minor injuries.

My New York guests were responsible for a hunt which I am now instituting into the origin of egg rolling on the White House lawn. It must have started somehow and somebody must have been responsible, but like so many things which we all take for granted, I never even asked how it began!

It is such a beautiful day today that the bridle path along the Potomac saw three of us cantering at 7:00 o'clock. Whenever I get up early, I realize how foolish I am not to do it more often. The air is cleaner and fresher and you feel the world belongs to you. A selfish feeling, but rather a pleasant one. We only met three other people riding and came back feeling very virtuous and invigorated by the exercise and the enjoyment of a beautiful world.

I love Washington in the spring when everything is fresh and green and the blossoms are out. Tulips of every color are blooming around the fountains in front and back of the White House. Later it will be hot and dusty and the sun will burn things up, but now nature is at her best everywhere.

A group of Girl Scouts from New Jersey came in to shake hands with me at 10:00 o'clock. Then there were a few individual appointments and I reached the Capitol in time for lunch with the Senate ladies. I always enjoy these informal parties, where a committee of ladies act as hostesses and bring delicious salads, cakes and coffee and wait on the guests.

I had not seen Mrs. Garner in some weeks and she looks very well and very young. Before luncheon was over, I discovered several very good reasons. In the first place, she eats judiciously and carefully and, in the second place, she was up and walking about this neighborhood, she told me, at 5:30 this morning. That is really an early hour and means your day is started so much ahead of everybody else that you probably never have a hurried feeling. How fine to be able to spread a sense of inward calm over all those who work with you! I have always been told that everybody felt it a priviledge to work with Mrs. Garner in the Vice-President's office. Now I know why.

The afternoon will be a succession of appointments and will end up with a visit to the opening of the Boys' Club of Washington, in the southeast section of the city. These clubs are of great help in keeping adolescent boys busy and in working off some of their energy. They should be fostered in certain environments wherever possible.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL