My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WASHINGTON, Monday—The rain held off all day yesterday, but it looked so threatening several times that I had great sympathy for the Easter crowds who tried to see Washington and did not dare go too far away from shelter. There were more people than usual outside of St. Thomas' Church when we went in and when we came out. The rector told me every seat in the church had been filled.

There also seemed to be more people around the White House, which makes me think a good many people have begun to feel a trip to Washington in the spring is educationally valuable for the children as well as being a pleasant way of spending the weekend.

We had a grand ride in the afternoon and spent a pleasant, quiet evening with some very dear friends who were celebrating their wedding anniversary.

This morning the sun was still hiding, but we opened the White House grounds on time. At 9:30, quite a crowd had collected when I went out to receive the basket of flowers which the underpriviledged children of the Good Samaritan Home present every year. They brought a band with them this time. The little girl who presented the basket was a trifle older than usual, so she made her little speech with great composure.

I wanted to ride this morning and knew that I would have no time for changes of clothes, so I put on riding clothes. When the pictures of the presentation of the flowers were being taken, I tried to shield myself by putting children in front of me, so I would not look too obviously bent on sport. The next time I will try to be a little more suitably dressed.

Even though the weather looks threatening, quite a crowd has collected. The band from the Boys' Training School has given its concert. The other bands; Loew's Capitol Theatre Band, the Metropolitan Police Club Boys' Band, the Alexandria George Washington High School Band and the United States Marine Band; will play through the day. I think it is rather nice to have children come to entertain other children before the grown-ups are admitted in the afternoon. The Capitol Theatre is sending over many of its entertainers who are going to put on their acts on an outdoor platform. Right now, a clown, Mr. Frank Portillo, is delighting the children with his antics.

At 1:00, the Fortnightly Club of New York, which was started many years ago by my aunts, Mrs. W.S. Cowles and Mrs. Douglas Robinson, and to which I still belong though I am rarely able to attend meetings, is lunching with me. In spite of the exciting festivities taking place on the lawn, we will try to focus our minds on a serious discussion—"Is Neutrality Practical?"

At 4:00 o'clock, Jimmie's little girls, Sara and Kate, and little Bill Donner Roosevelt, who is visiting us over Easter, will have a party of their own. When they sit down to supper at 5:00, I think every member of this household will heave a sigh of relief, for this is really a busy day.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL