My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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WARM SPRINGS, Ga., Wednesday—When I wrote you yesterday, my day was only half over, even though it was three-thirty! Out of my bag, I hastily took a pair of shoes and stockings which looked a little less utilitarian than those I had worn tramping around projects all morning. I barely had time to wash my face and tidy my hair, before Lucy Mason, whom I have known for a long while in New York, but who is now working on the labor situation in the South, came to see me.

What endless ramifications there are to human contacts and how easy it is to see things only from the point of view of individual interests! The employer has his point of view and the employee his. The cooperative viewpoint necessary to the well-being of both sides sometimes seems far away.

Because of some questions and letters on married women at work, which I mentioned in a previous column written in Seattle, "The Public Affairs Committee, Inc." of 8 West 40th Street, New York City, has sent me two pamphlets on studies which they have made. I have found them most interesting and think other women may want to read them. One is called, "Why Women Work" and the other "How We Spend Our Money." They cost ten cents each.

At 4:00 o'clock, the Mayor of Atlanta took Mrs. Scheider and me out to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Neely's farm. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Palmer and Mr. and Mrs. Robin Wood, accompanied us. I was interested in the house because it was built by Henry Toombs, who built our cottage at Hyde Park, where Miss Cook and Miss Dickerman live. Mr. Toombs also built the Memorial Library in the village of Hyde Park for my mother-in-law, and the new buildings at the Georgia Warm Springs Foundation. He is an artist to his finger tips.

The Neely house has some unique features. It fits into the landscape and, though you are living out of doors, you feel sheltered from rain and wind. This is accomplished by glass doors around three sides of a flagged court shaded by two big trees. You can let down the shades and draw the hangings and be indoors, but the moment you want to let in the out-of-doors, it is there for you to enjoy.

Mr. Neely is doing some interesting farm experimentation and has proved that the land in this part of Georgia, when properly treated, can give its farmers a good living.

After a delightful tea attended by Governor and Mrs. Rivers and many other people whom I had met before, including our old friends Bishop Atwood and Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Ives, we dashed back to the hotel. I changed into evening clothes and went directly to the meeting held in the Civic Auditorium for the conference of rural and urban women.

Five thousand women were present. The urban women were asked to pay one dollar each for their tickets to carry the expense of the two day meeting, but everything was free for the rural women. This was their party and I think it has set a pattern for similar conferences in other parts of the country. It is so important that we understand each other and cooperate and this understanding should exist among the women as well as among the men.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Palmer drove us back to Warm Springs, where we arrived about midnight. Today is glorious, but Mrs. Scheider and I are spending the morning catching up on yesterday's neglected duties.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL