My Day by Eleanor Roosevelt

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ATLANTA, Tuesday—Of course, it would not be possible to have two days as quiet as yesterday. Mrs. Scheider and I actually spent the whole afternoon in the little guest house we had arranged for ourselves and caught up on the mail with only two interruptions.

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Toombs have a small boy who is the same age as Mrs. Scheider's niece and we asked Mrs. Toombs to bring him to call. He is a very good-looking youngster, but shyness overcame him and I had to give him a bag of candy before I could lure him from behind a chair to speak to me.

Our other visitor appeared at the gate and sent word that she was a cousin through my Bullock family. I have a feeling that most of Georgia could claim some kind of kinship, so I ran up to the gate to shake hands with six new cousins.

After supper, I sat down and read a book for the Junior Literary Guild entirely through without an interruption. Such a thing has not happened to me in months and I must say it seems remarkably pleasant.

Today, however, has been a little more like our usual routine. Mr. Lassiter, state Director of NYA, and his wife, with Miss Shepperson, of the WPA, picked up Mrs. Scheider at 9:00 this morning and then stopped for me. Bag and typewriter in hand, we started off to see what we could of NYA projects, with a few glimpses of WPA projects thrown in.

Our first stop was at a camp which is being built in cooperation with the vocational education work for rural youth. There is a quarry on the property and the boys have been getting out the stone, cutting it, and putting up buildings. On a number of projects in Georgia, with the cooperation of the labor unions, they are training young people in definite skills and finding them jobs at the end of their training. This saves an employer the waste of training time and assures the employee an adequate wage from the time he or she gets a job.

We went to Monroe and stopped for a minute at a nursery school run by WPA and where NYA girls are used as assistants. Then we proceeded to a county agricultural high school which seemed to me to have the best practical farm setup I have seen anywhere. Georgia is largely a rural state and there is so much poverty in certain areas which might be improved by better education, that one can not help rejoicing that these young people are being given an opportunity to change the agricultural life of their state. We passed schools built with the help of WPA and gymnasiums and a number of other vocational buildings and community centers built by NYA. They are doing work in ceramics in parts of Georgia because they have clay excellently adapted to pottery.

The program for Colored youth in the state is also extremely interesting and efficient. They think they have the only really well developed recreational camp anywhere in the nation and I wish very much I had had the time to visit it today. We had to be back in Atlanta at 3:15, where I am now writing this column.

E.R.
TMs, AERP, FDRL